What's Behind Black-on-Asian Hate Crime? 'White Supremacy,' Claims Colorado Professor

(AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)

Thought you’d seen and heard it all? Welp, pull up a whoopee cushion and try this one on for size: According to an Asian American critical race studies and ethnic studies professor at the University of Colorado-Boulder, black-on-Asian hate crime in America is solely the product of… wait for it… white supremacy. Shocked? Me neither.

It occurred to me as I began to write this op-ed article that not all that long ago, this sucker could’ve been right out of The Onion or The Babylon Bee — although this particular beauty is more pathetically misguided than satirically funny.

Here’s Professor Jennifer Ho, as reported by The Washington Times:

“Anti-Asian racism has the same source as anti-Black racism: White supremacy. So when a Black person attacks an Asian person, the encounter is fueled perhaps by racism, but very specifically by White supremacy. White supremacy does not require a White person to perpetuate it.”

Let’s rewind that last part of the tape:

“White supremacy does not require a White person to perpetuate it.”

There it is, fellow white people.

Not only were you a racist white supremacist before you were even born (see: “critical race theory”), but the magnitude of “white supremacy” is so powerful within you that you don’t even need to perpetuate it or be involved in its manifestation in any given “racist white supremacist” incident: it’s still your —and my — fault.

Why, that’s damn near a super power, ain’t it? [sarc]

More racist CRT bilge from Ho:

“It is a belief that to be white is to be human…

[by whom, Ho? Exclusively, I mean?]

and invested with inalienable universal rights and that to be not-white means you are less than human

[same question, professor]

— a disposable object for others to abuse and misuse.”

“It is a belief.” Nonsense. Anyone can say “it is a belief” about anything, and as long as the fool saying it believes it, the fool is technically correct.

And a final, silly shot:

“It’s not black people whom Asian Americans need to fear. It’s white supremacy.”

Um, Ho? You wanna tell that to the elderly Asian man who was randomly, brutally, and repeatedly stomped on the head to the point of unconsciousness by a black thug in New York City, last month? Or perhaps you’d like to watch the video? Or this one from this week, with three black women?

Or maybe you’d rather check out the story of Black Lives Matter activist Christopher Haines, also last month, who was charged in two separate violent incidents against three Asian women — one day after he denounced hate crimes against Asians?

Or perhaps the Asian American NYC City Council candidate who in March was brutally attacked in a random crime by a black person — and was afraid at first to report the assault to the police for fear of recrimination?

Then again, we could talk about black Nikole Hannah Jones, founder of the controversial and historically ridiculously inaccurate 1619 Project, who has a habit of tearing into Asian Americans at every self-created racist opportunity.

I could continue, Ms. Ho. The list is long. And growing. About the only thing missing from any of the examples I’ve just cited are white people spewing hateful white supremacy racist-y kinda stuff. You know, like you. But as so “eloquently” spewed, white people are to blame, regardless.

“One of the Dirtiest Secrets of Urban America” 

Asian American writer, policy expert, and conservative intellectual Ying Ma recently observed:

“The people on the left who are so eager to talk about racism against Asians during the COVID pandemic…these people have been nowhere to be found in the past…particularly when the perpetrators are non-white.”

Ying Ma was right — on multiple levels.

In an op-ed published on the Washington Examiner website, earlier this month, titled An overdue conversation about black-on-Asian violence, Ying Ma wrote:

The frequency and brutality of anti-Asian violence have made “Stop Asian Hate” a popular hashtag and protest slogan this year. Still, America has yet to grapple with a core part of the problem: black-on-Asian crime and racism.

She related multiple examples of horrendous, black-on-Asian crime, including this one:

In January 2010, six black male teenagers kicked and beat 83-year-old Huan Chen after he disembarked at a light rail bus stop in San Francisco. They bashed his head to the ground and fled the scene laughing as Chen laid bleeding. He died two months later.

A survey conducted by the San Francisco Police Department in 2008 revealed that 85% of the city’s violent crimes were black-on-Asian, a figure officials in this notoriously liberal city confronted with “squeamishness.”

Almost always, bystanders of all colors, including Asians, look away in silence, but the racism on public display makes it crucial to conduct an inquiry about racial intent in black-on-Asian crimes committed with no profit or other apparent motive.

“Too many leaders have refused to engage [black-on-Asian crime and racism],” Ying Ma wrote.

Today, America must not only inquire but engage in a long-overdue, honest conversation about the prevalence of black crime and the existence of racism among nonwhite Americans.

The goal is not to vilify an entire race for the crimes of individuals, nor is it to absolve individuals of other races who commit racist acts. It is to find a pathway to reconciliation and possible solutions for preventing the tragedies that befell, Chen, Yu, and far too many others.

Which Leads Us Back to Jennifer Ho

In the more than a year since the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, we have seen — ad nauseam — radicalized ideologues so consumed by hatred that they are incapable of seeing and accepting reality. Critical Race Theory (CRT) programming, for example, has all but destroyed the left’s ability to engage in real critical thinking about racial issues in America.

As a result, radicalized groupthink is now the official language of the (self) white-loathing left. That is factual, regardless of how it sounds. Jennifer Ho is one of those people; so consumed by CRT that she is incapable of rational thought — even about horrendous hate crimes committed against other Asian Americans.

Drunk on CRT and consumed by racism, Ho pushes a dangerous and false narrative. She, like others, is hellbent on peddling the false narrative that white Americans — simply by their existence — are to blame for the wrongs of others, be those wrong racist actions, failure to succeed in life, or anything else.

Ho and people like her truly believe that “white supremacy” was to blame for the elderly Asian man in NYC stomped unconscious. That white supremacy was to blame for the kicking and beating death of 83-year-old Huan Chen who lay bleeding from a gash to his head, as six, black male teenagers fled the scene laughing.

Ying Ma is a courageous hero at a time desperately in need of courageous heroes. Jennifer Ho, on the other hand, is a disgrace to the Asian American community for whom she claims to speak. And she is not alone.

Asian, black, white, purple, or polka dot, the Jennifer Hos of America are determined to destroy us — and themselves, in the end.