Senate Intel Panel To Michael Flynn: No, Thanks

He offered. They said, “Meh.”

Well, it isn’t exactly like that, but for the time being, the Senate Intelligence Committee is declining former national security adviser Michael Flynn’s offer of testimony in exchange for immunity.

They’re not saying they’ll never call him, but for the time being, they’re not prepared to make a deal.

Committee Chairman Richard Burr (R-N.C.) earlier in the week strongly implied that Flynn would be a potential witness before the committee — telling reporters that “you would think less of us” if the committee had not talked with him.

The Senate Intelligence Committee has made requests to 20 individuals to be interviewed in connection to the investigation, and five of those interviews have already been scheduled, Burr said.

The remaining 15 interviews will “probably” be scheduled within the next 10 days, Burr said, and only Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and senior adviser, has been publicly identified.

Burr went on to explain that scheduling happens when they have some idea of what their line of questioning should consist of.

The impetus for Flynn’s eventual ouster from his position as national security adviser, and the subsequent knowledge of his work as a foreign agent for Turkey could likely require any questioning aimed at Flynn be a bit more “involved.”

It is common for witnesses to ask for immunity in exchange for testimony. Congress can grant such protections, but lawmakers typically do so only after consulting with the Justice Department, to avoid disrupting a federal investigation.

The Justice Department can delay a congressional immunity deal, but cannot not block one entirely.

So for now, Flynn may have to sit and simmer.

Along with the rest of us.