New Law Destined to Deal Another Blow to California: Schools Wouldn't Be Allowed to Suspend Students for Disobeying Teachers

A homeless man walks along a street lined with trash across the street from LAPD Central Community Police Station in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday, May 30, 2019. The union that represents the LAPD is demanding a cleanup of homeless encampments in the city after one detective who works downtown was diagnosed with typhoid fever and two others are showing similar symptoms. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

A homeless man walks along a street lined with trash across the street from LAPD Central Community Police Station in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday, May 30, 2019. The union that represents the LAPD is demanding a cleanup of homeless encampments in the city after one detective who works downtown was diagnosed with typhoid fever and two others are showing similar symptoms. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)

Liberal policies have really been doing a number on California over the years.

As we’ve seen recently, their homeless rate is skyrocketing while the problem is going down across the nation as a whole.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s San Francisco district is literally full of poop, a comment on her leadership in general. Los Angeles, another Democratic city, had to deal with typhoid fever on top of homelessness.

Now, Andrew Pollack, whose daughter Meadow was murdered during the Parkland mass shooting, is calling attention to another policy about to go into effect in California, a policy that is destined to have very bad consequences just as the failure to hold the Parkland shooter accountable for his prior bad behavior did.

The new law going into effect in 2020 in the next school year makes it illegal for public schools to suspend students in the first through fifth grades for “willfully defying teachers or administrators,” according to Kron 4.

Then, from 2021 through 2025, it will be temporarily extended to kids in grades six through eight.

Supporters say suspensions for willful defiance are disproportionately used against students of color.

So in other words, because some suspensions might have been used inappropriately, eliminate it as discipline altogether? How about actually making sure it’s used appropriately instead?

The logic behind the policy is mystifying. As Pollack notes, it almost guarantees greater problems when kids know there will no longer be that punishment. When they extend the policy to grades six through eight, to teens, then the problem will get exponentially worse. The article doesn’t talk about grades eight through twelve.