University Announces Mentorship Program, Only for 'Black, Latino, Native American' Students

(AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

At the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, STEM-stimulated students have a shot at an exciting opportunity.

As revealed by the Department of Mathematics, the Milliman Mentorship Program will fit participants with “their own mentor — a practicing actuary at (international actuarial and consulting firm) Milliman.”

Subsequently, they’ll “be able to learn about the field and what it takes to start a job that consistently ranks as one of the top careers in the nation.”

In case you’re not in the know, Purdue University defines the term:

An actuary is a business professional who analyzes the financial consequences of risk. Actuaries use mathematics, statistics, and financial theory to study uncertain future events, especially those of concern to insurance and pension programs. Actuaries may work for insurance companies, consulting firms, government, employee benefits departments of large corporations, hospitals, banks and investment firms, or, more generally, in businesses that need to manage financial risk. A career as an Actuary is better described as a “business” career with a mathematical basis than as a “technical” mathematical career.

“In addition to learning from a mentor,” the University of Illinois announces, “students will be offered financial aid in order to help cover the costs of studying for and taking their first actuarial exam. These exams are critical steps along the path to becoming an actuary and are often required by employers for both internships and full-time job offers.”

Key benefits:

  • Financial support to cover exam sitting fees for your first SOA exam
  • Financial support to pay for study materials or study course
  • Pairing with a mentor who is an actuary at Milliman. This person will offer advice about the actuarial profession and encouragement as you prepare for your exam.*

As for restrictions, the initiative’s aimed at underclassmen. And it’s exclusive to those with STEM interests.

In addition: It’s not for white people.

This program is currently targeted towards students of color, early in their college career, who may be interested in a STEM-oriented career.

Race has really rallied in the last couple years. Whereas we once societally sought a blind eye to color, nothing appears more important to notice as of late.

As it was previously put, “Ebony and ivory live together in perfect harmony.”

These days, the sharps and flats are being primed for their own instrument.

We’re being informed humanity must be split into at least two groups: whites and nonwhites, AKA “people of color.”

What’s the benefit?

So far as I can tell, for some, it’s deliverance:

Urbana-Champaign’s idea isn’t exactly novel; in June, I covered the story of the Career Opportunities in the Accounting Profession’s offer to 250 teens.

The official website promoted a “unique learning experience developed to expose” aspirants to “accounting and business careers.”

Nine top universities participated in the program, which required candidates to be New York residents and to not be white.

in May, London-based Nature Magazine described its summer internship thusly:

And in February, Wayfinding Academy college heralded free tuition to black and American Indian students.

Similar to the 1940’s, it would seem, race is considered colossally consequential.

Kids are being corrected:

For new-era youngsters, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign’s Milliman Mentorship will surely make perfect sense.

And what’s even better: For those who are “underrepresented minorities (Black, Latino, Native American),” it’s something in which they can actually take part.

-ALEX

 

See more pieces from me:

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Professor Insists U.S. Is ‘Only for White People,’ Talks ‘Redemption’ When ‘There Is No America’

Find all my RedState work here.

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