Jimmy Hoffa's Burial Site Possibly Discovered

(AP Photo/The Daily Breeze, Stephen Carr)

About two years after Jimmy Hoffa's disappearance, when "findings" of Hoffa or his corpse were still daily touted in the media of the day, my Dad walked into the living room where a 17-year-old me was sitting reading something or other. "They found Jimmy Hoffa," he announced.

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"Really? Where?" I asked.

"Bellevue Hospital," Dad replied. In those days, Bellevue Hospital was known for its Psych Ward, although it was a general hospital that provided all manner of care.

Dad continued: "He was in the maternity ward."

"What was he doing there?"

Dad replied, with a perfectly straight face, "Organizing labor."

Now, a non-profit cold case group called The Case Breakers thinks that they may actually have found Hoffa's burial site. Personally, I'm skeptical.

The Case Breakers said a "a dying police sergeant’s scribbled instructions on an ace of spades" playing card helped lead their yearslong investigation to the old site of Milwaukee County Stadium in Wisconsin, according to a Wednesday press release.

The alleged burial site is next to the current Milwaukee Brewers stadium, American Family Field, where they believe Hoffa’s body lies in a spot under where the demolished stadium’s third-base line previously stood.

Jim Zimmerman, a 13-year member of Case Breakers and a former police officer, is credited with locating the ace of spades playing card which they say was written by a dying police sergeant believed to be involved with Hoffa's kidnapping.

"Independent sources in three states convinced the volunteer investigators that CSI forensics will reveal Hoffa’s remains at a little league field, in the shadow of Milwaukee’s MLB stadium," the press release stated. Three credible witnesses are said to have claimed that six years before the demolition of Milwaukee County Stadium, Hoffa’s body was moved from another location and "secretly buried in 1995 under this old stadium’s 3rd base."

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That led The Case Breakers to the site, where they examined the location with the tools of the trade: electronics and a cadaver dog:

The Case Breakers went to the location, utilized old aerial photographs and GPS satellite images, and deployed "ground-penetrating radar over the remote location three times." The operator’s equipment was not able to detect beyond 5 feet because, according to Case Breakers, an "unexpected clay layer" blocked the radar, which they believe suggests a dig had taken place that was "hurriedly excavated and backfilled."

Additionally, Case Breakers founder Thomas J. Colbert told Fox News Digital that the team brought one of the "top" cadaver dog experts to the site, retired cop Carren Corcoran, and her dog gave a positive signal several times.

The next step will be exhuming whatever remains may be buried here, and presumably DNA analysis to confirm that any body parts uncovered are (or could be) Hoffa's.

Jimmy Hoffa disappeared on July 30, 1975. Hoffa had just been released from prison in 1971, where he had been serving a 13-year term for jury tampering and bribery until his sentence was commuted by President Richard Nixon. On his release, he immediately went about reclaiming his earlier position as President of the Teamsters Union, but the conditions of his release precluded him from taking part in labor organization (any rumors about Bellevue Hospital notwithstanding). He nevertheless set up a meeting with two known Mafia members who were also involved in Teamsters leadership, those being Anthony "Tony Po" Provenzano and a Detroit capo named Anthony Giacalone. Hoffa left his home for the meeting on the morning of July 30 and never returned. The next day, his family reported him missing, but his remains were never found — until, maybe, now.

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The chances of any remains in this Milwaukee location actually belonging to Jimmy Hoffa, of course, are probably slim, and at the moment, nothing is known other than a cadaver dog got some hits. Sadly, the Hoffa family more than likely won't get any closure out of this.

Hoffa was riding tall in the saddle when the Teamsters were a force to be reckoned with, and they are still big players in the labor union world; they remain, though, primarily a private-sector labor union. These days, the Teamsters aren't all they were when Hoffa was The Big Guy (yes, play on words intended.) It's public-sector unions that are major players now. They may not have the blatant Mafia connections, but teachers' unions are the ones causing trouble these days, between spending a lot of time agitating on issues that are none of their business and campaigning for leftist politicians.

Finding Hoffa would be an interesting event. It would provide some valuable closure to his family. It would provide some publicity to The Case Breakers. And that's about it.

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