EXPOSED: Harvey Weinstein Isn't the Only Villain in the Recent Sexual Assault Stories

Let’s just traverse the landscape of the recent deluge of women coming forward to share their stories of sexual abuse at the hands of powerful men.

Sitting below sea level on the scale are the three attention-seekers that came late to the #metoo party (or in their case, the #LookAtMeToo party), and picked a soft target in a wheelchair-bound, Parkinson’s-stricken, 93-year old former president, far too near death’s door to do much more to defend himself, than to offer apologies for offending them.

Yeah. Forgive us if nobody feels compelled to whip out their hankies because an elderly man may have touched you from behind or told a barely-naughty joke.

Just go away.

Then there’s the extreme, actual horror stories of women victimized by producer and studio executive, Harvey Weinstein.

This was a monster who used his position, and the ample cover of a hypocritical Hollywood scene to treat actresses and female employees as an easily accessible pool of personal playthings.

Some of the charges against Weinstein go from the uncomfortable to actual rape, and why he’s not in jail, I’ll never understand.

How can you make it any worse?

Some of the sidebar activity is pretty gross, actually.

Let’s talk about Lisa Bloom, spotlight chasing attorney and daughter of Gloria Allred (another absurd “celebrity” lawyer).

Bloom has made her name pretending to be the champion of victimized women. She has popped up, like a nasty cold sore, representing everybody from the Trump sexual abuse accusers before the election to Kathy Griffin’s ridiculous, teary pleading, after seeing her career take a battering because of her dumb, severed Trump head stunt.

Indeed, wherever there is a victim and a spotlight, you can count on Lisa Bloom.

Yeah. About that “friend of victims” routine… It may be more accurately described as “friend of money and power.”

We know that Bloom recently stepped away from her client, Harvey Weinstein. There was just too much, and he was becoming far too toxic to defend. It would have been a career killer for her to continue on with him.

A new report, however, tells how Bloom was complicit in attempting to victimize some of Weinstein’s accusers twice.

Lisa Bloom is a perfect example of the hypocrisy of the feminist movement, and according to the Daily Beast, she went to Ronan Farrow, who broke the Weinstein story, and offered him dirt on Rose McGowan, in an attempt to discredit her, ahead of the Weinstein story.

“I don’t know if you’ve talked to Rose McGowan, but we have files on her and her… history,” Bloom told Farrow, according to knowledgeable sources inside and outside NBC.

It doesn’t matter what her history is. This is the same thing as blaming a rape victim for dressing provocatively.

Bloom was referring to the star of the 1996 Weinstein-produced hit horror movie Scream, who had indeed given Farrow an on-camera interview (and later withdrew her participation out of fear of being sued for violating a non-disclosure agreement that had come with a $100,000 settlement from Weinstein); since then McGowan has alleged publicly that the movie mogul raped her at the Sundance Film Festival in 1997.

Let’s reiterate: Lisa Bloom has built her career around this image as a powerful advocate for the feminist movement, empowerment of women in the face of their male oppressors, yada, yada, yada.

This, and when the rumblings first began that her rich, male client, Weinstein, was about to be outed as the abusive, raping monster that he is, Bloom sought to get ahead of it and undercut a rape victim.

With friends like that…

Was it just McGowan?

Especially damaging was a New York Times report that after the newspaper published its Oct. 5 blockbuster about the now-fired studio chief, Bloom had contacted the board of TWC, according to leaked emails, to suggest releasing “photos of several of the accusers in very friendly poses with Harvey after his alleged misconduct.”

So she was really building a case against the women here, wasn’t she?

Maybe she was under some illusion of Weinstein as misunderstood or innocent?

Or maybe not.

At this year’s Sundance Film Festival, according to prominent litigator Thomas Ajamie, Weinstein had boasted at a breakfast meeting of the sex he had had with Hollywood actresses. (The encounter is related in full at the end of this piece.)

“Look I’m a famous movie producer, everyone wants an Academy Award, I can really help their careers,” Weinstein reportedly told Bloom and Ajamie.

Bloom said to Weinstein, “Wait, wait, wait, Harvey, you’re married. Are you saying you had sex with these women while you were married?”

Weinstein responded, “Yes, Lisa, that’s exactly what I’m saying.”

To which Bloom responded, “But your wife [Georgina Chapman] doesn’t know?”

Weinstein replied, “No, I don’t tell her.” Bloom said, “You’re cheating on your wife, right?”

Weinstein said, “Well, yeah, Lisa, this is Hollywood and this is what happens.”

Bloom replied, “OK, I’m just a little taken aback by this. But I’m not judging you or anything. I’m not judging.”

No, you were likely too blinded by dollar signs to judge.

She knew what he was.

In fact, according to the DB story, before reaching out to Farrow, she’d previously (and successfully) worked to shut down another story about Weinstein’s treachery that was planned for New York magazine.

Bloom was able to convince Farrow to reveal his work on the Weinstein story, as he felt that there would be some sort of “professional courtesy” between lawyers that assured her confidentiality.

Nope.

Yet no sooner had Farrow divulged to Bloom his interest in Weinstein than executives at NBC and Hollywood’s Creative Artists Agency, Farrow’s professional representatives, began to receive a barrage of calls and letters, as the movie mogul (a longtime pal of NBC Universal Vice Chairman Ron Meyer and others at the company he’d done business with) sought to wield every ounce of leverage to stop Farrow’s investigation.

Weinstein attorney Charles Harder, Hulk Hogan’s former lawyer who famously helped bankrupt Gawker Media, was especially aggressive, threatening to sue Farrow personally, in what one recipient of Harder’s letters (which listed Bloom as his co-counsel) described as a campaign to discredit the messenger.

The letters sent supposedly sought to discredit Farrow, claiming he was unfairly biased because of his own family’s experiences with sexual assault.

Farrow’s network, NBC, shut down the project, so he just moved it to The New Yorker, where it broke open the dam, releasing a flood of horrific, demeaning, and gut-wrenching tales of Weinstein’s depravity.

Meanwhile, back in March, Hollywood trade publications and the Times had reported that Bloom’s 2014 book on the Trayvon Martin case had been optioned by The Weinstein Company for a television docu-series to be co-produced by JAY-Z.

Well, how nice for her.

In recent weeks, troubling questions have surfaced about Bloom’s practice as an attorney—notably her misleading attacks on public-radio host and Hollywood Reporter Editor at Large Kim Masters on behalf of a second wildly off-brand client, accused sexual harasser, and former Amazon Studios head Roy Price.

Bloom, along with her co-counsel Harder, aggressively tried to discredit Masters, whose reporting on Price’s sexual harassment of producer Isa Hackett ultimately forced Price’s resignation on Oct. 17.

Despite being advised that her assertions were false, Bloom repeatedly claimed to a series of media outlets that considered publishing Masters’ story about Price’s alleged misconduct that the respected journalist had tried to shake down her client for advertising money for her weekly radio show, The Business. (The Daily Beast considered publishing Masters’ story about Price.)

Good grief, woman.

It just goes on and on. The takeaway is that Bloom’s on-camera antics as the feminist warrior is a fraud. Complete, and total fraud.

Several unhappy former Bloom clients such as comedian Kathy Griffin, former Fox News commentator Tamara Holder, and others have come forward to claim that the lawyer seems more interested in scoring big paydays, going on television, and mingling with celebrities than in toiling on the feminist and civil-rights causes that first brought her to public attention.

That.

Bloom’s own mother isn’t defending her, at this point. She’s actually throwing a bit of shade, saying she’d never represent a man like Weinstein, because she works for the victims.

And while Bloom has now stepped away from Weinstein, it may be too little, too late.

Rose McGowan lashed out at Bloom on her Facebook page, summing up the appropriate attitude towards Bloom’s deceitfulness.

“Your very name makes my stomach clench with a stressed tightness that takes my breath away. As does your mercenary act of depravity,” the actress wrote on her Facebook page in an 1,100-word indictment of Bloom. “Did you think of how it would affect victims to see you champion a rapist? How it felt to those you once ‘fought for,’ for them to know that you used them. You remember them right? They were the victims of assaults, women you’d previously helped. You lied to those hurt women and hid your true character. You wanted a shortcut to fame.”

Appropriate, indeed.

If any good can be culled from this whole, ugly thing, it’s that the Hollywood meat market has been graphically exposed, and that vultures like Lisa Bloom have been, as well.