The Good News We Can Glean From the Texas 'Super-Spreader' That Wasn't, as 73K Gathered

(Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun via AP)

You may have heard about the Canelo Alvarez/Billy Joe Saunders fight that happened on May 8. It got some attention, because it was the most heavily-attended event that the country has seen since the start of the pandemic. 73,126 people were packed into AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas. It was also believed to be the biggest crowd ever in attendance at an indoor, U.S. boxing match, as we reported.

While masks were encouraged at the event, you can see many dispensed with them.

As my colleague Becca Lower termed it, “Texas Gov. Abbott Just Showed America What Freedom Looks Like — in One Photo.”

Now, media and the left would likely be screaming it was a “super-spreader” event, and if anything was going to set off an outbreak of the Wuhan coronavirus, that might be it.

Except as Allahpundit observed at Hot Air, not only didn’t cases go up, the cases are actually down more than they were on May 8. He observed that the seven-day average of statewide cases on May 8 was 2,507 cases. The most recent average, from May 20, is 2,024. That’s a 19% decline. The county average was 169 per day on May 8. As of May 20, it had declined to 134. That’s a 21% decline.

Only 42% of people in Texas have gotten their first vaccine dose, he observes. Despite most Texans not being fully vaccinated, there still wasn’t any apparent outbreak. So, that suggests that either the numbers were dropping so rapidly that any ‘outbreak’ from the fight was absorbed, or that people at this point may have developed sufficient immunity from having had it — plus some being vaccinated — that the case numbers are just dropping with no outbreak.

Allahpundit notes this is even with Texas being in the bottom half nationally, when it comes to vaccination rates.

Texas is in the bottom half of the 50 states measured by vaccination rates yet it appears there’s already enough immunity across the population that 73,000 fans can get together indoors with no impact on the downward trend line in cases. Joe Biden’s hopeful scenario a few months ago that enough Americans might be vaccinated by July 4 to make small backyard barbecues safe has never seemed more quaint.

So, that would seem to bode very well in the movement toward herd immunity, even without high vaccination rates yet.

In any event, it’s very good news for Texas — and good news for the rest of us — when we’re looking at the progress of where things are going. Texas now has its lowest positivity rate since they began keeping data during the pandemic.