Football Coach Eugene Chung Says NFL Told Him He Was 'Not the Right Minority' in Coaching Interview

In an interview with The Boston Globe, NFL assistant coach Eugene Chung revealed that he had interviewed for a coaching position in the off season but was told that he wasn’t right for the job because he isn’t considered the “right minority.”

Chung is Korean-American and was the first Asian-American first-round draft pick in the NFL after an historic college career at Virginia Tech. He played three seasons with the New England Patriots before moving on to the Jacksonville Jaguars and ending his career with the Indianapolis Colts. Chung was elected into the Virginia Tech Sports Hall of Fame in 2008. His groundbreaking credentials would seem to make him an excellent candidate for a coaching position, particularly considering how desperate many major corporations like the NFL are to check the “diversity” boxes for social media mobs.

Unfortunately, Chung was passed over in his recent interview because he apparently did not check the right kind of diversity box for the NFL.

It was said to me, ‘Well, you’re really not a minority. I was like, ‘Wait a minute. The last time I checked, when I looked in the mirror and brushed my teeth, I was a minority. So I was like, ‘What do you mean I’m not a minority?’ ”

The response was disturbing, according to Chung.

“You are not the right minority we’re looking for.”

The New York Post points out that the Rooney Rule in the NFL has is meant to expand and encourage minority hiring, which might be why the team allegedly told Chung his ethnicity wasn’t the good kind when it comes to diversity.

The NFL has expanded the Rooney Rule to promote minority hiring beyond just head coach vacancies, to include front-office and coordinator positions. The rule is not intended to exclusively help black candidates gain opportunities, as it also applies to females, Latinos, Asians and other minority groups. Teams that develop minority candidates who are hired to premium positions are rewarded with extra draft picks.

But Chung felt overlooked during his interview.

“That’s when I realized what the narrative was,” Chung said. “I was blown away, emotionally paralyzed for a split second. I asked myself, ‘Did I hear that correctly?’ ”

Despite how he was treated in the interview, Chung says he has not no intention of “bashing” the NFL and overall his experience in the organization has been positive.

“I’m not sitting here bashing the league at all, because there are great mentors and there are great coaches that embrace the difference,” Chung said. “It’s just when the Asians don’t fit the narrative, that’s where my stomach churns a little bit.”

Of course, we know what Chung’s alleged interviewer meant. On the social justice pie chart, minorities who are self-made successes are not allowed to carry the mantle of minority-hood. That would put an inconvenient dent in the narrative of the progressive left.

Take it from this middle-class Black American. I know how gleefully the left erases minority success stories that don’t depend on progressive white saviors.