Disney ‘Mulan’ Credits Chi-Com Government and its Office That Operates Concentration Camps

In this undated photo released on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2009, by MediAdvertising (H.K.) Ltd., Chinese actress Zhao Wei's character Mulan is seen in the film "Mulan." More than a decade after Disney made a blockbuster animated film out of a folk tale about a young woman in ancient China who takes her father's place on the battlefield, Hong Kong director Jingle Ma is taking on the story of Hua Mulan with real actors. (AP Photo/ MediAdvertising (H.K.) Ltd.)

 

Another corporation continuing its fealty to the communist regime is seen in this new release.

There has been much conversation surrounding the release of the new Disney live-action motion picture. Following its Vault Classics formula of adapting titles from its animation catalog, ‘’Mulan’’ was set to be the studio’s big summer release. COVID changed all of that, and as it now has made its way to streaming, we are seeing some of the small ways it has bowed to the Chinese Communists.

The property itself is an important one for the studio as it was always made with a direct focus on China. This seems obvious given the story based on a Chinese legend of a young girl who becomes a national hero after she masquerades as a male in order to take her father’s place in military service. Disney had to both pay proper respect to the legend, but the company also had to comport with the current government leadership. One of the alterations was excising the character of Mushu, the red dragon voiced by Eddie Murphy in the animated original.

But in looking to earn approval from the Chi-Coms the studio has encountered other controversial challenges. Yifei Liu, playing the titular lead, drew some scorn when she appeared to show support for the police force in Hong Kong that had been battling protestors rising against the Chinese leadership. Her supposed support for the Chi-Coms, as well as the controversial police support, created a backlash and call for a boycott.

The studio also had issues when it was attempting to avoid controversy. It altered one storyline involving a love interest with Captain Shang. This was done as a response to the MeToo Movement, as it was looked at as possibly inappropriate for a superior to have a relationship with an underling. However, not only did this anger fans of the original but also the LGBTQ community, as they viewed Shang as an iconic figure. He wrestles with feelings for Mulan and this trends towards a bisexual awakening in the eyes of some.

Now, it is being learned that in the closing credits, the studio has shown its gratitude towards the oppressive Chinese government. Many started to note this bit of curious ‘’Special Thanks’’ handed out to a Chi-Com office.

What is the issue here is thanking the Turpan Public Security Bureau, which operates in southern Xinjiang, where much of the principal photography took place. This is the region where the controversy over the aggressive policing of the Muslim Uighurs by the Chi-Coms has been centered. 

The uproar over concentration camps used to house the Uighurs has been overseen by the Turpan Public Security Bureau. They stepped up this aggression with police checkpoints in the regions and encampments housing the people the government deems detestable the past few years. The shooting of ‘’Mulan’’ took place in late 2018, wrapping around November. The production had to have been in full swing as these activities were in place, and it appears the studio had to work with and/or earn permission from the TPSB in order to film in the region.

This revelation follows news recently exposed that camps the National Basketball Association had been operating in China had severe human rights abuses taking place. This extended numerous other controversies the NBA experienced over its Chinese relationship. It now begins to appear as if another major US company has another human rights issue attached to its commerce with the Chi-Coms.