New Timeline of Mark Milley 'Treason' Invalidates His Defense

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

With all the news surrounding the border crisis, Biden’s crashing approval, and Hunter Biden’s corruption, another story flew under the radar over the last couple of days involving Gen. Mark Milley.

You’ll recall that Milley called the Chinese up to promise to commit treason (as defined by the statute) in order to undermine then President Donald Trump. It was an astonishing revelation that showed just how far our military leadership has fallen. Milley was, of course, at the head of pushing critical race theory to servicemembers and the disastrous evacuation from Afghanistan that left 13 Americans dead.

Now, the details of the phone call to a PLA general are emerging, and the timeline is invalidating the excuses lodged by those who ran to defend Milley.

When this story initially broke, much of the media, including some on the right, rushed to suggest that Milley was justified in breaking the chain of command and promising to commit treason because he was “doing his job” to “avoid war” during an “unprecedented” time following January 6th. According to the narrative, things were so up in the air regarding the future of our Republic after the trespassing event at the Capitol (a hysterical contention on its own) that Milley had no choice but to effectively declare himself a military dictator and take control of the government.

Except, according to the above excerpts, the call most in question didn’t occur after January 6th. Rather, it occurred on October 30th, 2020. If you aren’t good with calendars, that was before the election even took place. Thus, all the ridiculous contentions that Milley was allowed to call up a PLA general to extend an offer of aid, one that could put American servicemembers and interests in harm’s way, simply don’t wash. Milley was lashing out and undermining the elected president of the United States long before January 6th became an issue. Though, to be clear, even if this call had taken place after January 6th, it still wouldn’t have been justified.

To this point, we’ve yet to see any evidence to back up Milley’s concern regarding the Chinese either, which again undermines the defenses offered regarding his actions. There is nothing to suggest Donald Trump was going to attack China prior to the election or after.  Rather, this appears to be another example of Milley being subservient to the CCP in a way that raises a lot of questions about his entanglements with the communists. What does China have on Milley?

Regardless, the talking point that Milley had any justification for what he did falls flat on its face in light of the now confirmed timeline of events. This was a man who committed a soft coup. I know that sounds overwrought, but what else do you call a military general who started conducting his own foreign policy in order to essentially take control of the government under the guise of “protecting” it?