Neil Cavuto Plays the Fool, and He's the Exception to the Rule

(AP Photo/Richard Drew)

For the most part, Fox News’ lineup is stacked with ratings winners. Tucker Carlson, of course, dominates everyone in every timeslot, but other shows like The Five and Primetime also routinely beat their competition. Hannity and The Ingraham Angle fight a tug of war on a weekly basis for the top spot in their timeslots as well.

But there’s one show that consistently gets crushed. That would be Neil Cavuto’s early afternoon program. He’s the exception to the rule, where even Fox News’ show without a host (Primetime) wins its timeslot handily.

I bring this up to point out a recent decision by Facebook, which we’ll get to in a second, that has further diminished Neil Cavuto as a newsman. You may recall last year when Cavuto took to the air to give a hysterical disclaimer, distraught after Donald Trump had mentioned hydroxychloroquine in a presser.

Apparently, Cavuto was under the impression that hydroxychloroquine was some highly dangerous, untested drug that would literally “kill” you. In reality, it’s one of the most common drugs in the world, being used in high numbers since the 1960s. To the extent it can kill you, every drug in existence can kill you if taken wrong.

Regardless, here was his quote.

“I cannot stress enough. This will kill you. So, again, whatever benefits the president says this has, and certainly it has had for those suffering from malaria, dealing with lupus, this is a leap that should not be taken casually by those watching from home or assuming, well the president of the United States says it’s OK.”

“I only make this not to make a political point here but a life and death point.”

Cavuto was, in fact, making a political point, as hydroxychloroquine had been politicized to the point of insanity at that point. You see, while the drug was being adopted around the world and helping people recover from COVID, the media simply couldn’t allow the bad orange man to get a win. So they talked down the drug, acting as if it were equivalent to poison, greatly suppressing its use in the United States.

Let’s also note that Cavuto’s concern over hydroxychloroquine killing people with certain conditions came from two highly publicized studies which were eventually debunked and retracted (see That Big Hydroxychloroquine Study the Media Went Nuts Over Turned Out to Be a Scam).

Now, contrast Cavuto’s rantings with this decision from Facebook to stop censoring positive reporting on the drug after multiple studies found that Trump and others were right. That hysteria appears to have been completely unjustified, and worse, possibly deadly.

How many thousands of people died over the last year because the media, including Cavuto, were out there bashing on hydroxychloroquine, telling people it’d kill them if they took it? We’ll never know the answer to that, but it’s disgusting to think that politics played such a prominent role in what treatments were given for a highly infectious, sometimes deadly disease.

In light of all this, I’m left wondering what the point of Neil Cavuto is. His ratings are trash and far lower against his top competition than any other Fox News show (outside of perhaps weekend programming). He’s essentially become the daytime version of Chris Wallace. Even his financial insight seems dated, as Charles Payne is not only far more entertaining, but far more connected with the current goings-on of the market.

How long does Fox News let this continue given their recent restructuring? That’s a question yet to be answered.