Christian Rapper from Viral Target-Shaming Video Speaks Out—Sings 'Take the Rainbow Back'

Singer Jimmy Levy says "take the rainbow back." (Credit: Jason Whitlock)

In May, I wrote about the hysterical, scathing “Boycott Target” viral rap song that rocketed to the top of the charts and bumped the likes of Taylor Swift and Luke Combs from the top ranks. Performed by Forgiato Blow and featuring Jimmy Levy, Nick Nittoli, and Stoney Dudebro (I admit to being familiar with exactly none of the artists), the song combined blistering satire with a catchy tune to destroy retailer Target’s awful, woke Pride displays, which featured such things as “tuck” swimwear—seemingly designed for children—and clothing designed by a person who is an avowed Satanist.

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The company has since seen its market cap drop by billions.

Now, one of the singers is explaining his philosophy and why he does what he does. But before we get to that, you have to watch the video for context:

I’m no rap fan—sometimes one of my daughters will play it in the car and I will angrily be forced to turn it off because the lyrics are so profane. But I actually liked this song.

Levy said that the success of the tune showed that the Hollywood elite and companies like Target (and Bud Light) are out of touch with the pulse of America:

[The popularity of the song] shows that we’re the majority no matter what, the mainstream and Hollywood—and the industry wants to promote whatever agenda they want to promote and try to make us look like we’re the minority— people of God, patriots, Americans. It’s just not the truth.

And no matter what, God prevails.

Amen, brother.

Not surprisingly, Big Tech tried to prevent the success of the song and worked behind the scenes to kneecap it. Meta CEO Mark Zuckerberg and of course Apple were up to their usual tricks:

“It took like a couple of days for people to be able to actually search it on iTunes. The only way they were able to find it was on the charts. They were not allowing it to be searched,” Levy claimed. After the artists drew attention to the perceived censorship, Levy said “suddenly it was searchable again.” He said he and others also faced censorship on [Zuckerberg owned] Instagram and TikTok for trying to share the song.

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Levy asks a very important question:

And it’s like, ‘why is a song that’s speaking out against people that are basically grooming our children, getting taken down?’ It’s just very weird. Why are we protecting that? But we allow all these other horrible things online to just stay on, you know?

He appears on another tune that’s been making some noise, the Christianity themed “Reclaim the Rainbow,” which blasts the Los Angeles Dodgers for their controversial decision to host the anti-Catholic group “Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence” and says—rightfully—that the rainbow symbol has been hijacked, and that the former symbol of hope and innocence is now used to promote radical gender philosophies.

Watch:

 

I wasn’t familiar with the work of either Bryson Gray or Shemeka Michelle, but to my mind, this video is as powerful as any that I’ve seen in calling out the woke insanity that has overtaken our nation.

Naturally, in today’s twisted environment, the song received heavy backlash from the media and the woke, who claimed it was “homophobic” and hateful. Levy says, not true:

We made it basically like musical history, getting No. 1 with a song about God’s promise. And, you know, they try to flip it and say that we’re hating on people.

If you know me, I love everybody. I’ve never treated anybody different. I have friends that have all different types of views and I give them the biggest hugs like they’re my close friends. We never let our disagreements affect us. However, I don’t ignore the truth.

And love also means the truth.

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As I said, I’m no rap aficionado, but I say, keep on singing, Jimmy Levy (and your co-creators). The more voices that speak out against this madness, the better.

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