Daily Links - February 2, 2012


Today is February 2nd. On this date in 1863, Mark Twain was “born.” Which is to say, Samuel Clemens (born November 30, 1835) used the pen name for the first time. Also on this date, Buenos Aires was founded, and New York City was incorporated (at the time named New Amsterdam), in 1536 and 1653 respectively. Today would also be Ayn Rand’s 107th birthday. If she weren’t dead. Which she is. Thanks a lot, OBAMA! And finally, we would be remiss if we didn’t note that today is Groundhog Day. And finally, we would be remiss if we didn’t note that today is Groundhog Day. And finally, we would be remiss if we didn’t note that today is Groundhog Day. Links, Open Thread, etc.

Mitt Makes Himself a Target Again | Rush Limbaugh
“But I even have a problem with this in context. ‘I’m not concerned about the very poor. We have a safety net there.’ The safety net is one of the biggest cultural problems we’ve got! We had better be worried about it …”

Calls Confirm Planned Parenthood Misleads on Offering Mammograms | LifeNews.com
“Every one of the Planned Parenthood centers admitted they could not do mammograms. Every Planned Parenthood, without exception, tells the women calling that they will have to go elsewhere for a mammogram, and many clinics admit that no Planned Parenthood clinics provide this breast cancer screening procedure.”

Indiana: the Nation’s 23rd Right to Work State | Hoosier Access
“After over 40 hours of testimony, debate, and discussion over the past year House Bill (HB) 1001, Employee’s Right to Work passed the Indiana House of Representatives last week and today passed the State Senate.”

Obama: Biblical principles prompted me to push for Dodd-Frank and Obamacare | Hot Air
I think I speak for everyone when I say … THEOCRAT!!!!11!!!!!

Today’s Word of the Day comes from Dictionary.com, and applies to so much in politics.
peroration (per-uh-REY-shuhn): noun 1. A long speech characterized by lofty and often pompous language. 2. Rhetoric The concluding part of a speech or discourse, in which the speaker or writer recapitulates the principal points and urges them with greater earnestness and force.