The RNC's Response to Trump's Immigration Speech is the Definition of a Dysfunctional Relationship

Presidential candidate Donald Trump gestures to the crowd gathered in front of the Trump Tower ahead of the passing of pope's motorcade Thursday, Sept. 24, 2015, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen)

This is the very definition of a dysfunctional relationship.

They can’t get along, but they can’t quit each other, either. They have nothing in common, but are drawn to each other, and will make excuses to the outside world for why they stay together. Even as the world watches in horror, one partner is always willing to defend the other, while suffering and dying a little more in private, each day.

Or it’s the very definition of the relationship between Donald Trump and the RNC.

The Republican National Committee scrapped plans to praise Donald Trump’s immigration speech Thursday after the nominee slammed illegals and even suggested deporting Democrat Hillary Clinton, according to news reports.

But both RNC Chairman Reince Priebus and the Trump denied to The New York Times that the relationship between the parties was strained.

Denial.

RNC Chairman Reince Priebus and Trump spokesman, Jason Miller, are putting on the public face that everything is A-Ok, and call any reports that may say otherwise “overblown gossip.”

However, six senior Republicans cited the Arizona move as an example of how the relationship between the committee and its nominee has “grown strained over the last month,” according to the report.

These Republicans have “detailed knowledge of both groups, some of whom asked to speak anonymously for fear of exacerbating tensions,” the Times reports.

Since both sides rely on a joint fundraising agreement, a full-scale break is not likely — but any rift could “threaten … the party’s ability to work smoothly with Mr. Trump during the most critical post-Labor Day phase of the race,” according to the article.

One example would be the event of several Hispanic supporters of Trump choosing to walk away and withdraw their support after his hardline speech in Phoenix.

Stephen Miller, a senior policy adviser with the Trump team actually slammed Priebus in an email to Trump staffers.

“The RNC needs to take control of this situation and quickly,” Miller wrote, the Times reports.

He called the departing advisory council members “professional amnesty lobbyists,” before asking, “Can Reince do his job?”

The weasel-y Priebus can be blamed for much, but the words out of Trump’s mouth are solely the responsibility of the squirrel sprinting aimlessly on the busted wheel that is his brain.

As for the RNC, they seem to have no ability to just call a spade a spade.

They complain of divisive power struggles between top advisers and Trump family members — and noted that the nominee has now installed the third leadership team of his campaign.

Priebus, whom the Times reports has a “warm” relationship with Trump — “and speaks with him daily” — has told some of the Republicans that he has been “disappointed” at the candidate’s inability “to evolve as a candidate in the general election.”

But the chairman denied making such statements.

Right. Because Trump has evolved.

And de-evolved. And evolved.

We’re still two months out from the general election. That’s plenty of time to kiss and make up.