Trump Isn't the Only Executive Battling Leaks

Kansas City, Mo. Mayor Sly James, center, flanked by Fresno, Calif., Mayor Ashley Swearengin, left, and and Boston Mayor Martin Walsh, joined White House press secretary Josh Earnest during the daily news briefing at the White House in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2016, to discuss a variety of topics affecting U.S. cities. President Barack Obama is hosting a reception for the nation’s mayors at the White House later today. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

One of the unfortunate hallmarks of the Trump administration thus far has been an overabundance of leaks.  While Attorney General Jeff Sessions has now officially declared a #WarOnLeaks, it appears the President isn’t the only executive who’s battling them.

Kansas City Mayor, Sly James, has threatened to file ethics complaints against city council members for revealing information from closed sessions of council meetings, a number of which concern plans for a new terminal at KCI.  Two competing policies are in tension here:

The Missouri Sunshine Law requires elected bodies to hold discussions and votes in public settings, with some exceptions including receiving legal advice, negotiating a real estate deal or discussing personnel issues. Such negotiations can be held in private.

Kansas City’s ethics code says it’s a violation to divulge information from closed sessions without authorization.

Council members have voiced concerns over the “culture of secrecy” at City Hall.  James reportedly hasn’t yet initiated an investigation into the leaks, just issued the threat.

Interestingly enough, as noted by the KC Star:

The threat itself came during a closed session.

Sounds like someone (or several someones) in on the closed-door meetings is determined to bring more of their meetings out into the open. Which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.