Soledad O'Brien Calls War Veteran Tulsi Gabbard a 'Coward' After 'Present' Vote and It Does Not Go Well

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, speaks during the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019, in the Fox Theatre in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, speaks during the second of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Wednesday, July 31, 2019, in the Fox Theatre in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

As Brandon Morse wrote last Thursday, 2020 presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI) defended her “present” vote on the articles of impeachment by stating that impeachment “should never come about as a culmination of a highly partisan process.”

She also told The Hill that using impeachment was a political tool was something the founding fathers warned against:

“This is something that our founding fathers warned us about,” Gabbard said.

“Making this statement, voting ‘present,’ taking a stand for the center. Standing for our democracy and really that this decision of whether to remove Donald Trump or not must be in the hands of voters,” she added. “I believe that they will make that decision.”

She later posted a video to her social media accounts, explaining her decision a little more detail, asserting both major political parties were trying to do “maximum damage to each other” for “a win”, and that it was destroying America:

Gabbard’s explainers on why she decided to vote “present” were not good enough for “journalist” and prominent TDS sufferer Soledad O’Brien, who took to the Twitter machine to call Gabbard, an Iraq war veteran, an “American Coward”:

In addition to retweeting people who agreed with her about Gabbard, O’Brien doubled and tripled down on her description of the Hawaii congresswoman as a “coward”:

Twitter users let O’Brien have it:

Yours truly also weighed in:

The other war veteran she called a “coward” earlier this year was decorated war hero General James Mattis for, as Bonchie noted at the time, “refus[ing] to break his personal rule of verbally bashing presidents still in power” in his memoir.

To be sure, military veterans are not off limits from criticism if they say things others disagree with, but calling someone you disagree with who volunteered to serve in harm’s way a “coward” is not exactly what I would call a smart way of trying to prove your point.

In fact, if you haven’t volunteered to serve yourself – as is the case with O’Brien – it’s an extraordinarily stupid tactic. Then again, you shouldn’t expect too much from a partisan shill who couldn’t even cut it on a Democrat-friendly news network like CNN.