Biden Faces Some Jeers While Visiting Tornado Damage in Kentucky

AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

Joe Biden went to Kentucky to visit the area hard hit by tornadoes that ripped through multiple states last week, killing at least 88 people, with at least 100 missing in Kentucky. He stopped at Fort Campbell and then went to Mayfield, one of the cities that looked like a bomb hit the area in the wake of the tornadoes.

But not everyone was welcoming to Joe Biden. Some started up a “Let’s go, Brandon!” chant after he emerged from his motorcade.

A BBC reporter confirmed it and also remarked on the Trump flags.

Biden surveyed the damage and met with local leaders including the Governor of Kentucky, Andy Beshear. Biden promised that the federal government would cover the emergency costs for the first thirty days including “debris removal, the cost of overtime and law enforcement, emergency service personnel and shelter.” He’s approved emergency declarations for Kentucky as well as Illinois and Tennessee. Biden also took an aerial tour of the damage in Mayfield, followed by a ground tour through roads lined with destruction.

While he was there, he told them the story about his wife and child being killed in an accident and said that something “good” would come out of the tornado tragedy.

Biden hugged a little boy and introduced him as his new “friend,” Dane.

He also spoke to a 12-year-old girl who had an American flag.

But he just couldn’t leave out the politics, even in a visit that is supposed to be about extending comfort and support to the people of the area.

At one point, he joked with a woman wearing Green Bay Packers apparel that she should tell star NFL quarterback Aaron Rodgers that “He’s gotta get the vaccine” — a reference to Rodgers’ stand against the COVID-19 shot.

Biden again seemed to blame climate change, despite no evidence that the tornadoes were due to it. “We got 99 billion of damage just this year…because of weather and climate change. We’re going to get it done. I’m impressed by the way everyone is working together, I really mean it.” He previously seemed to blame climate change, claiming it made everything more intense.

Thousands of people still remain without power in the area.