FBI Director Wray: The Constitution is to be Respected in Moderation

F.B.I director Christopher Wray is shown before speaking to reporters during a dedication ceremony for the new Atlanta Field Office building Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017, in Atlanta, (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

You know the Bill of Rights and the rest of the Constitution? FBI Director Christopher Wray thinks they need to be compromised instead of respected strictly!


F.B.I director Christopher Wray is shown before speaking to reporters during a dedication ceremony for the new Atlanta Field Office building Thursday, Oct. 12, 2017, in Atlanta, (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

FBI Director Wray wants you to think Apple is the issue when they make iPhone encryption so good, that the FBI has trouble breaking into one. But it’s not. The issue is FBI’s mindset of entitlement to have complete access to your personal information on demand:

Wray adds that he believes that there needs to be some kind of balance between public safety and encryption, but whether or not tech companies or the public feels the same way is a different story. “I get it, there’s a balance that needs to be struck between encryption and the importance of giving us the tools we need to keep the public safe. The threats that we face keep accumulating, they are complex, they are varied.”

Sorry, there’s no balancing against the Constitution. You must resign immediately if you refuse to obey it. The Fourth amendment says “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated” and the right to encrypt our data in a secure manner helps us be secure in our papers and effects.

The people are sovereign citizens. We are not subjects with an obligation to make ourselves easily searched on demand by a police state.

Molon Labe, Christopher Wray. Molon Labe.