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The Day After a Dark One: Lost Nuance and Too Much Confusion Flood the Country

AP Photo/Paul Sancya

It wasn’t hard to wrap my head around what happened yesterday. Every question about what went down has a very obvious answer to it.

The riot on the capitol was a polarizing event and for more than just two groups. The left wants to pearl clutch about the riot and make it seem like this is the darkest day for Americans since 9/11. They want to use it to sensationalize the right again, making us all seem unstable and violent thanks to our willingness to stupidly follow a bad orange man.

The right is split into two groups.

There are those who think the riot in the Capitol building was a heroic event where patriots broke into the halls of power and shook the country’s leaders to the core, reminding them who was really in charge around here.

Then there are the others who see the riot inside the Capitol as a ridiculous action carried out by people with no real goal other than to film or be filmed being somewhere they shouldn’t be, destroying things that don’t belong to them, accomplishing nothing, and embarrassing themselves and the rest of their ideological community.

To be sure, it was all a ridiculous circus be it the rioters on the right or the sensationalists on the left. As I elaborated in an article earlier, a real revolution wouldn’t have a lot of resemblance to the insurrection we saw yesterday. A real revolution would have been far more bloody, horrific, and tragic.

(READ: A Real Revolutionary Coup Would Look Much Different Than the Stupidity We Saw at the Capitol)

A tragedy did occur yesterday and blood was spilled as Ashli Babbitt was shot down by Capitol Hill police in what absolutely seems, so far, like the officer overreacting and firing his weapon at an unarmed woman who didn’t really pose a threat to him.

That said, if this was a real revolution, Babbitt would be one name among hundreds, if not thousands.

Some things need to be recognized about this riot, however.

Before it was a riot it was a protest that Americans from across the country attended en masse, and they had a very legitimate reason to be there. So many unanswered questions remain about the 2020 presidential elections and, when these questions are asked, they’re often greeted with silence or derision. This only spurs them into feeling cheated even more and the anger rises.

When half of America can’t get the answers it needs as to why their election process was so filled with irregularities and shady behavior and that it may have cost them their election, anger is going to rise. There’s no way around that. Telling them to shut up was only going to make that half angrier.

They have every right to ask these questions and demand answers. Without a free and fair election, there is no free country, and this country wants to be free.

This group didn’t shoot anyone when they came together to protest. They didn’t burn down businesses or loot them. They didn’t shoot bystanders who disagreed with them or violently assault someone they even suspected to be their opponent. They came to D.C. to stand together and cheer for the guy they voted for.

What the group that spun-off from these people did inside the Capitol was inexcusable, but to define the entirety of the protest to that incident would be foolish.

In the end, this isn’t about Trump, he was just a catalyst. The spark that lit the flame.

The anger seeps much deeper than one election. The politicians in D.C. have become something beyond the reach of normal people. They’ve integrated themselves into the Washington machine so deeply that they live like royalty and even sometimes rule like it. The American people have watched as they’ve played one dirty trick after another and even made the people an afterthought when it came to writing legislation about them.

Even when it came to issuing checks amidst the lockdown, our own politicians deemed other countries worthy of receiving far more money than many Americans will see in their entire lives.

The anger is legitimate even if the actions by a few were not. We need to stop sensationalizing the ridiculous actions of some in order to invalidate the anger of the many.

We can’t let this important piece of nuance get lost in the confusion. If it does, we can expect this to happen again, and possibly next time, it’ll be worse.