Terry McAuliffe's Campaign Goes From Bad to Worse After New Allegations of Wrongdoing Emerge

AP Photo/Alex Brandon

Maybe Terry McAuliffe pulls off a victory in the blue state of Virginia on Tuesday, but the gubernatorial candidate has not had a good month. It’s been one self-inflicted wound after another. Yesterday, in what I believe was likely a coordinated smear, employees of the Virginia Democrat Party got caught posing as white supremacist supporters of Republican Glenn Youngkin.

Then there were the accusations of racism, the doubling down on trashing concerned parents, and McAuliffe’s attempt to kill a damaging story showing his campaign paid money to election conspiracy kook Marc Elias. I could keep going, but I won’t — while noting that there are several more examples of such strategic brilliance occurring in just the last week.

Now, another big story has broken. McAuliffe’s campaign appears to have possibly taken $350,000 from a foreign entity. Further, that company is linked to a money-laundering scheme.

“Terry McAuliffe has a history of accepting foreign contributions.  The FEC must fully investigate these serious charges that he accepted $350,000 in illegal foreign contributions for his current campaign,” said Washington, D.C. attorney, Paul Kamenar, counsel to NLPC, who drafted and filed the complaint with the FEC.

LycaTel LLC, owned by Sri Lankan-British national Allirajah Subaskaran, gave McAuliffe $350,000 in July, the Free Beacon first reported in early October. The company is a New Jersey subsidiary of Subaskaran’s U.K.-based telecom conglomerate, which boasts a complicated web of offshore businesses and has been the subject of tax-fraud and money-laundering charges in France.

Whether this is actually illegal or just extremely unethical would depend on what an actual investigation finds, and we all know there won’t be one, because this is a Democrat we are talking about. The donation could be legal if the American-based subsidiary gave the money without any direction from its foreign leadership. That’s a very gray area, though, and one ripe for abuse. For my part, I highly doubt this New Jersey-based telecom company just decided they really liked Terry McAuliffe down in Virginia.

If there exists a more perfect scam to launder foreign cash to an American politician, I’m not aware of it. McAuliffe’s campaign has been an absolute dumpster fire from the beginning so I wouldn’t put anything past him. What I do know is that despite gobs of outside money and influence, including visits from Barack Obama and Joe Biden, McAuliffe finds his political future on life-support in a state he should be walking to victory in.

To their credit, most Virginians have shown themselves to be more astute than Democrats give them credit for. Instead of lining up along partisan lines to deliver McAuliffe an easy win, voters have handed Youngkin major momentum, even in places like Alexandria, where the Republican candidate held another high-energy, well-attended rally last night. If there’s any electoral justice left out there, and I’m not sure there is, Youngkin will put McAuliffe away next week. If that happens, it’ll be a great day for Virginia and the country as a whole.