Paul Ryan Blows Off Bannon's Declaration of "War"

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., speaks as the White House and congressional Republicans are finalizing a tax plan, at Republican National Committee Headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017. Ryan began his remarks by promising help for devastated Puerto Rico, calling it a "humanitarian crisis." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Apparently, the only ones afraid of Steve Bannon are the ones who work for him at Breitbart.

House Speaker Paul Ryan?

Yeah, he doesn’t care.

Speaking on MSNBC’s “KasieDC” on Sunday night, the subject of Bannon’s threats against those he considers to be the “establishment” GOP was brought up.

Bannon, along with another nationalist Trump administration refugee, Seb Gorka, used this weekend’s Values Voter Summit – a gathering of what was supposed to be Christian Conservatives – to declare “war.”

Not a single thing they pimped resembled the kind of talk you’d expect at a Christian gathering, but then, watering down Christianity with politics isn’t going to get you a very strong version of Christian values, anyway.

Of Bannon’s ridiculousness, Ryan said he’s not helping the party (he’s not), but that he’s not that worried about him.

Said Ryan:

“I don’t think it’s helpful to go after fellow Republicans. What’s most helpful is if we all unify around our common goals, principles and purposes and get an agenda passed,” he said. “I don’t think having these fights are helpful. But at the same time, I don’t think it’s going to deter us from doing what we say we were going to do. ”

Ryan brushed off attacks from Bannon’s conservative news outlet by laughing at the idea of them attacking him.

“Death, taxes and attacks from Breitbart,” he said. “I’m so used to that that to be honest you don’t spend time thinking about things like that in this job, things that are out of your control.”

And he’s right not to. Somebody like Bannon shouldn’t be given that much control over our system.

Ryan went on to give props to President Trump for being actively engaged in getting tax reform together.

“He’s helping us with tax reform. Do I wish he would tweet less? I course I do. He knows that. That’s something out of my control and I don’t think it’s something that’s going to change,” he said.

And it will always be a stumbling block.

“Is he going around and helping us sell tax reform and connecting with people? Did this president as a Republican win Wisconsin for the first time since ’84 and Pennsylvania and Ohio?”

And maybe that will be enough, but with his toady, Bannon, working to weaken the party and risk losing the majorities Republicans hold in the House and Senate, he could be putting Trump in a bad position.