The Pentagon Updates the Situation in Puerto Rico and It's Not Great

National Guard Soldiers arrive at Barrio Obrero in Santurce to distribute water and food among those affected by the passage of Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017. Gov. Ricardo Rossello said "This is a major disaster." "We've had extensive damage. This is going to take some time." (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti)

No, it’s not a made-up crisis.

And no, it’s not because they’re sitting back and waiting for others to do the work for them.

Last week, the military reported that a whopping 44 percent of Puerto Rico was left without drinking water.

Since President Trump is determined to impress upon the world all the wonderful work “his people” are doing in the area, you could just about expect that number to be heading down.

According to a spokesman from the Pentagon on Saturday, however, that’s not really the case.

According to their most recent assessment:

Fifty-five percent of the population did not have access to drinking water, the Pentagon said in a Saturday press release.

A Navy hospital ship is on the way to the island, but isn’t expected until Wednesday.

Other details from the press release:

  • FEMA is reporting that 59 of 69 hospitals are partially or fully operational.
  • 95 percent of citizens are without power.
  • 49 percent of grocery stores are open.
  • 851 of 1,100 gas stations are now open.

So are things getting better?

Yes. Slowly but surely.

Are they still in dire straits?

Yes. They are. Fifty-five percent of citizens without drinking water is a real problem, so for a president to sit in the comfort of a luxury golf resort and insult the people who are living through this situation is beyond the pale.