Russian TV Host Calls Trump More Dangerous Than North Korean Dictator

FILE - In this Saturday, Oct. 10, 2015 file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves at a parade in Pyongyang, North Korea. North Korea is preparing to hold a once-in-a-generation congress of its ruling party that is intended to rally the nation behind leader Kim Jong Un and could provide an important glimpse into Kim’s plans for the country’s economy and military. The congress is set to begin May 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

This is a switch.

Not necessarily for the better.

It can also be written off as one talking head overselling, for the sake of ratings.

Dmitry Kiselyov, the top TV personality for the Kremlin, is calling President Trump a bigger risk to the world than North Korea’s dictator, Kim Jong-un.

Bloomberg reports:

Russian officials aren’t so harsh in public. Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov Monday urged the U.S. to avoid any unilateral use of force against North Korea, warning this would be “a very risky course of action” and comparing it to the U.S. missile strike earlier this month on Syria, which Moscow denounced as aggression. Lavrov spoke after U.S. Vice President Mike Pence said “the era of strategic patience is over,” while on a visit to the demilitarized zone between South and North Korea Monday.

While Russia condemns the “brinkmanship’’ of the ballistic missile tests by the isolated Communist state in violation of United Nations Security Council resolutions, this doesn’t justify breaking international law, Lavrov said. “So I really hope that the same unilateral actions we saw in Syria won’t happen.” Russia maintains close ties to North Korea, with which it shares a border, but isn’t an ally to the regime like China.

A lot of the growing dissatisfaction that Russian officials have towards the Trump administration is slowly unreeling on state-run television.

“Ivanka already convinced Trump to bomb Assad, what if she convinces him to bomb Kim,” warned NTV’s main newscaster, Irada Zeynalova.

“The world is a hair’s breadth away from a real nuclear war with all its catastrophic consequences,” Kiselyov warned his viewers. Other state-TV presenters offered a ray of hope for Russians, pointing out that the radioactive fallout from a possible conflict on the Korean Peninsula likely would be carried eastward by prevailing winds, away from Russia.

While Trump’s numbers in the U.S. are on shaky ground, they are even worse in Russia.

In March, 7 percent of Russians viewed President Trump negatively. They believed what he said about forming a warmer relationship, now, that number is up to 39 percent who view him negatively.

In a sign of the tensions, Lavrov hit out at U.S. National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster for saying the Trump administration will have “tough discussions” with Russia. The top Russian diplomat said Moscow won’t pay attention to the words of an adviser since Trump has said he’s committed to dialogue.

TV host Kiselyov does tend to say a lot of nutty things.

He’s the guy that suggested Russia would turn the U.S. into radioactive ash, so it’s not like he’s the cool-headed, rational sort.

Then again, Trump’s military posturing, as of late, is bound to make other world powers a little uncomfortable.