Democrats Propose Multiple Bills to Target Trump Presidency

Committee member Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Ma., questions witnesses during a Senate Specials Committee on Aging hearing on drastic price hikes by Valeant and a handful of other drugmakers that have stoked outrage from patients, physicians and politicians nationwide, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, April 27, 2016,. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

This can be rightly labeled a Democrat exercise in futility.

And while no one is more repulsed by a Trump presidency than me, I can honestly say that Democrats in the House and Senate are completely off their nut, at this point.

In their anti-Trump ragers, rather than address serious issues and work to get the nation on firm footing, post-election, Democrats are pushing several bills that they know will go nowhere.

One resolution is aimed at amending the Constitution to eliminate the Electoral College, which many Democrats want after both Hillary Clinton and Al Gore lost to Republicans even after winning the popular vote.

Are you catching that?

They apparently have no problem with the Electoral College system, as long as they’re winning. If the system works against them, however – WHOA!

Other bills being pushed by Democrats are focused on Trump’s transparency issues. They’re asking that he disclose his tax returns and/or divest fully from his investments.

The purpose behind those I completely agree with. I don’t know if they require special legislation, however.

This is the equivalent of Democrats flinging themselves in the middle of the floor and flailing wildly, in order to get attention.

It’s also pointless.

Republicans hold the majority in the House and Senate, and while some may be less than thrilled with Trump as Commander-in-Chief, it is not likely that they will act against a Republican president.

Even if he’s just a Republican-by-convenience.

Those Democrats with nothing better to focus on, right now:

Senator Ben Cardin, D-Md.

S.Con.Res. 4. Clarifying any potential misunderstanding as to whether actions taken by President-elect Donald Trump constitute a violation of the Emoluments clause, and calling on President-elect Trump to divest his interest in, and sever his relationship to, the Trump Organization. Introduced Jan. 4, with 28 cosponsors.

Senator Cardin’s concern is that Trump not receive payments or gifts, related to his businesses, from foreign players.

That’s a concern for a lot of people on both sides of the aisle, but for now, a bill addressing that may be jumping the gun.

Representative Peter Welch, D-Vt.

Con. Res. 5. Concurrent resolution clarifying any potential misunderstanding as to whether actions taken by President-elect Donald Trumpconstitute a violation of the Emoluments Clause, and calling on President-elect Trump to divest his interest in, and sever his relationship to, the Trump Organization; to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Introduced Jan. 4, with 46 cosponsors.

The resolution “calls upon President-elect Donald J. Trump to follow the precedent established by prior Presidents and convert his assets to simple, conflict-free holdings, adopt blind trusts managed by an independent trustee with no relationship to Donald J. Trump or his businesses, or take other equivalent measures, in order to ensure compliance with the Emoluments Clause of the United States Constitution.”

Representative Anna Escho, D-Calif.

H.R. 305 is Rep. Escho’s push to have Trump’s taxes opened up. The bill has 30 co-sponsors.

Representative Steve Cohen, D-Tenn.

H.J. Res. 19. A joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution of the United States to abolish the electoral college and to provide for the direct election of the President and Vice President of the United States. Introduced Jan. 5, with 1 cosponsor.

That single co-sponsor is the only other person who doesn’t realize how unreasonable it is to suggest an end to the Electoral College.

Senator Elizabeth “Fauxcahontas” Warren, D-Mass.

S.65, A bill to address financial conflicts of interest of the President and Vice President. Introduced Jan. 9, with 23 cosponsors.

“The only way for President-elect Trump to truly eliminate conflicts-of-interest is to divest his financial interests by placing them in a blind trust,” she said. “This has been the standard for previous presidents, and our bill makes clear the continuing expectation that President-elect Trump do the same.”

Do you think they consulted with each other about these bills, since some just seem so similar?

Representative Katherine Clark, D-Mass.

H.R. 371. A bill to address financial conflicts of interest of the President and Vice President. Introduced Jan. 9, with 111 cosponsors.

Another bill to address conflicts of interest.

Representative Marcy Kaptur, D-Ohio

H.J. Res. 26. A joint resolution denying Congressional consent for President Donald J. Trump to accept any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign state throughout the tenure of his Presidency; to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform. Introduced Jan. 10, with 36 cosponsors.

Seriously, people? Are you just throwing every conceivable thing against the wall, hoping at least one sticks?

And finally, Representative David Cicilline, D-R.I.

H.R. 540. A bill to require the disclosure of the Federal income tax returns of the President. Introduced Jan. 13, with 20 cosponsors.

Just when you thought Democrats couldn’t be reasonable.

Oh, wait…

We can expect the same kind of petty, partisan bickering for the entirety of Trump’s stay at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

Democrats have long made obstruction and foot-dragging a hallmark.

This is no different.