Pearl Harbor Day: A Remembrance

A date which will live in infamy…

This day, December 7, 2016, marks the 75th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, near Honolulu, Hawaii. It was the event that kicked off America’s involvement in World War II.

On that day in 1941, a two hour attack destroyed 20 Naval vessels, around 300 airplanes, and claimed over 2,000 military lives, while wounding another 1,000.

The United States would not see an attack on our soil of that magnitude until some 60-years later, on September 11, 2001.

It was Japan’s increasing aggression against China, believing that they must expand and take over the import market of their neighbor, that led to sanctions and trade embargoes. The goal was to discourage the expansion into Chinese territory, but instead, they dug their heels in, and war seemed inevitable.

The attack on American soil, however, was unexpected. There were European colonies in the South Pacific, for example, that were much more convenient. As a result, Pearl Harbor was relatively unprepared and unprotected.

On December 8, 1941 President Roosevelt delivered a rousing address to the American people, and with Congress’ approval, and overwhelming backing from the citizenry, we committed to go to war.

Three days later, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States.

Japan’s attempt to intimidate America into lifting sanctions had erupted into a major world conflict.

As you remember this day in our history, reflect that humanity’s inability to coexist is not a new concept.

This was America’s greatest generation for a reason.

I found a bit of government stock footage with scenes from the attack, as well as Roosevelt’s speech, and scenes from the public’s response.

I’ll admit, I was shocked to see there were snowflakes, even within our greatest generation.

Admittedly, none of them appeared to be defecating on police cars, but they were there with their signs.

Enjoy the footage, as you take a few minutes to remember the day, and those who fought so hard for this nation.