BREAKING: NC Gov McCrory to Meet With Trump, A Day After Conceding Gov's Race

FILE - In this June 24, 2016 file photo, North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory speaks during a candidate forum in Charlotte, N.C. North Carolina’s Republican lawmakers have legalized needle and syringe exchange programs across the state to combat a heroin epidemic law enforcement officials say is reaching critical levels. McCrory on Monday, July 11 approved the law despite objections from some conservative representatives who say such exchange programs only facilitate addictions. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

I can actually feel good about this.

As the days and weeks following the election labored on in North Carolina, my most ardent desire was to see Governor Pat McCrory hang on to his seat. The man has been phenomenal for the Tar Heel state, undoing several decades of damage and debt that was left over from twenty years of Democrats in control in Raleigh.

When the worst news possible came down the pike, that McCrory was conceding, that was it for me. I was officially done with this election season and with a state that is so full of low information voters, that they would effectively cut off their noses to spite their faces by letting a man of McCrory’s caliber get away, based mainly on single issues (and a healthy dose of Democrat corruption).

McCrory wasn’t an ardent toady of Donald Trump’s, but he was loyal to the party.

I was in Raleigh on election night and heard Governor McCrory say that he had just received a call from VP-elect Mike Pence. Admittedly, the two are closer than he and Trump.

Thinking back to that, and watching the revolving door of potential cabinet appointments interviewing at Trump Tower, it wasn’t a far stretch to imagine that should McCrory find himself free from the governorship, Trump would be calling.

Well, this:

Two days after conceding in the North Carolina gubernatorial race, Republican Gov. Pat McCrory plans to meet with President-elect Donald Trump in New York, Trump’s transition team announced Tuesday morning.

Sean Spicer, a Trump spokesman, told reporters McCrory is expected to meet with Trump on Wednesday at Trump Tower but gave no further details.

Neither McCrory’s office nor campaign has confirmed the meeting. Trump plans to be in Raleigh, N.C., on Tuesday night as part of his “Thank You” tour.

Asked over the summer whether McCrory could get a job in his administration, Trump told The (Raleigh) News & Observer, “Certainly, it would be something I’d consider.”

McCrory’s closeness to Pence could be a driving force behind any decision to bring McCrory in as a member of the Trump administration.

Both men have proven their fiscal merit, as they were both listed in the top 5 of the nation’s governors for their tax policies by the Libertarian-leaning Cato Institute (McCrory at #2 and Pence at #5).

McCrory also has a weighty resume.

McCrory’s background includes a long career in politics and in the private sector with Duke Energy and Charlotte-based Moore & Van Allen Law Firm, as well as his brother’s consulting firm. He served on the Charlotte City Council and was Charlotte mayor for 14 years.

He also served on the federal Homeland Security Advisory Council for four years, appointed by former President George W. Bush in 2002.

Most recently, the HB2 bathroom bill and the surrounding controversy, driven by liberal activists with no vested interest in the well-being of North Carolina have hit McCrory hard, and may have added to his struggle in the polls, leading up to the election.

That is not his legacy in the state, however.

Beyond the bathroom bill controversy, McCrory’s administration has won praise for lowering state income taxes, raising teacher pay and overseeing major road and infrastructure investments statewide, including a $2 billion long-term plan to improve schools, utilities and public safety.

Now I wait with interest to see if Trump is wise enough to offer a position – any position – to this vastly qualified public servant.

He deserves it.