Senator Mark Kirk Explains His Rejection of Trump

FILE - In this June 6, 2013, file photo, Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., speaks during a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing in Washington. Key Democratic and Republican senators are crafting legislation to reinstate the full force of Iran sanctions and impose new ones if Tehran doesn’t make good on its pledge to roll back its nuclear program, brushing aside the Obama administration’s fears about upending its diplomatic momentum. Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and Kirk hope to have the bill ready for other lawmakers to consider when the Senate returns Dec. 9 from its two-week recess, according to legislative aides. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Senator Mark Kirk is onboard with #NeverTrump.

The embattled Illinois senator at first was willing to support the GOP nominee, but the weight of Trump’s gaffes and outright hostility have put the party on defense and it’s not a position Kirk wants to be in.

Kirk spoke about his concerns with nominee Trump while being interviewed on WLS-AM 890 radio, out of Chicago Thursday morning. When asked if he felt Trump understood the serious nature of the threats our nation faces, or if he felt Hillary Clinton would be better, Kirk answered:

“I do not support Hillary Clinton,” Kirk said in response, according to audio posted by BuzzFeed, “and I told the public that I did not support Donald Trump, either. I think he’s too bigoted and racist for the Land of Lincoln.”

Kirk will instead write in former CIA Director David Petraeus.

“I think if he announced, he would just light up the political spectrum,” Kirk said.

I don’t really know that David Petraeus would “light up” the political spectrum, but then again, the desperation of some would likely cause a considerable buzz.

The time has never been more right for a third party. So far, attempts to draw in a legitimate and willing third party candidate have hit many walls.

Kirk, however, has well-articulated the concerns of those GOP leaders who were formerly supportive of Trump.

“As the presidential campaign progressed, I was hoping the rhetoric would tone down and reflect a campaign that was inclusive, thoughtful and principled,” Kirk had said in a statement. “While I oppose the Democratic nominee, Donald Trump’s latest statements, in context with past attacks on Hispanics, women and the disabled like me, make it certain that I cannot and will not support my party’s nominee for President regardless of the political impact on my candidacy or the Republican Party.”

It’s a bold stance, but a growing voice of dissent against this madness that has been forced on us.