Is the Libertarian Party the Safe Haven for Conservatives?

Maybe the Libertarian party isn’t the home disenfranchised conservatives are looking for.

Since Trump became the presumptive GOP nominee, principled conservatives are fleeing the party and looking for an agreeable option. While I’ve been a strong advocate for a conservative, third party paladin, none seem to be forthcoming.

Sadly, all the strongest conservative voices are also, apparently, party loyalists. Something about the captain going down with the ship comes to mind.

GOP, do or die.

With some now giving serious consideration to the Libertarian party, the party may soon find itself in a position to move their headquarters out of the back booth of your local Waffle House and into more suitable digs.

Gary Johnson is the current frontrunner from the crop of Libertarians hoping to gain a foothold for their party in this election.

In a podcast interview with Joe Rogan, Johnson had some interesting ideas about government that are the very illustration of why thinking conservatives should be hesitant to jump on that particular bandwagon, at this time.

From the Washington Examiner:

The former New Mexico governor told podcast host Joe Rogan that if he were to build the federal government from scratch, he might seek out a benevolent dictator.

“So if we woke up today and there was no government at all, do you think that we would possibly create one guy that runs the whole thing; we would agree that that would be the best way to run things?” Rogan asked.

“I have a theory that the best way to run things would be that every 16 years we would have a benevolent dictator take over for two years,” Johnson answered before cracking a smile.

Maybe he was joking. Maybe he wasn’t. I’m not sure that’s the sort of thing any serious candidate should be joking about at this juncture in our nation’s history.

I will admit that I find a lot of the fiscal platform that Libertarians stand on to be appealing. Their belief in the free market and aversion to government redistribution of wealth is absolutely solid.

However, for those who are both fiscally and socially conservative, the social platform of Libertarians may be out of line with what they believe.

From the Libertarian website, listed under “Self-Ownership”:

Individuals own their bodies and have rights over them that other individuals, groups, and governments may not violate. Individuals have the freedom and responsibility to decide what they knowingly and voluntarily consume, and what risks they accept to their own health, finances, safety, or life.

This goes to their belief in the legalization of drugs that many conservatives see as troublesome.

Also, from listening to Gary Johnson, Libertarians may have an issue with states like North Carolina passing bathroom bills, necessary for protecting their citizens from predators, since liberals have sought to erase the realities of biology and gender.

Speaking on the uproar over HB2:

But Johnson also bristled at President Obama’s use of executive action to intervene in the controversial bathroom debate regarding which public restrooms should admit transgender persons. Johnson opposed Obama’s action, and called bathroom restrictions, such as the North Carolina legislation, discriminatory in its intent.

Instead, Johnson proposed that men and women in the United States could use certain facilities together, including showers.

“We’re spreading awareness that ‘Oh shoot, in Europe they shower together?'” Johnson said.

“Yeah, but that means your wife has to shower with some dude,” Rogan interrupted. “Like, trust me, that’s not going to fly.”

“Right!” Johnson answered. “Well, it flies in Europe.”

It may fly in Europe, but very few men in America will be comfortable with their wives or daughters being subject to strange men walking in on them in their most vulnerable state.

We’re not looking for another failed European social experiment. We look after our women and children here.

At least, we used to.

For these reasons, among others, I have to reject the Libertarian party as an ideological safe haven.

The search continues.