"Reverend" William Barber Leads "Moral Monday" Protest Against Bathroom Bill

In this Wednesday, June 24, 2015 photo, Rev. William Barber, president of the state chapter of the NAACP and architect of the protests known as "Moral Monday, speaks during a Bible study at Pullen Memorial Baptist Church in Raleigh, N.C. His supporters describe Barber, 51, as a leader the likes of which the country hasn't seen since the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

North Carolina’s icon of rotund pomposity, “Reverend” William Barber, has lumbered forth to lead another “Moral Monday” protest in Raleigh. Today’s protest was aimed at the state’s controversial HB2, bathroom bill.

If your head is spinning over a protest event titled “Moral Monday,” led by a supposed reverend, and designed to fight for the right of men to walk into the bathrooms and shower rooms of women, then welcome to the tragically twisted world of cultural Marxism.

Barber is the head of North Carolina’s NAACP and a poor man’s Al Sharpton. He was relatively quiet in all the years that the Tarheel state languished under the mismanagement of Democrats. He only suddenly found a voice for protest when the state elected its first Republican governor in over two decades, oddly enough.

From abc11.com:

NC NAACP President the Rev. William Barber has said he thinks the law is discriminatory and contends its supporters are manipulating the public to believe it’s about protection.

“’This bill is morally indefensible, it’s constitutionally inconsistent, and it’s economically insane,’ Barber said. ‘If the legislature was really concerned about children, they would fully fund public education and support teachers.’”

Barber was probably too busy planning his next attention-grabbing protest to stay abreast of current events that dispel his complaints.

Because of the surplus the state has managed under McCrory, the governor has proposed a considerable pay raise for teachers.

Barber’s NAACP thugs joined with the Forward Together movement to descend on Raleigh’s Bicentennial Mall, between the Legislative Building and the old Capitol building, where Governor Pat McCrory keeps his Raleigh office.

While the stated cause was to have HB2 repealed, the standard progressive calls of higher minimum wage and expanded protections for fringe special interest groups was also on tap.

Through the course of the protests, there were 11 arrests made, mainly for trespassing and failure to leave the House principal clerk’s office when asked.