The People Running the School Shooter Training Camp Go to Court and the Result Will Shock You

Defendants, from left, Jany Leveille, Lucas Morton, Siraj Wahhaj and Subbannah Wahhaj enter district court in Taos, N.M., for a detention hearing, Monday, Aug. 13, 2018. Several defendants have been charged with child abuse stemming from the alleged neglect of 11 children found living on a squalid compound on the outskirts of tiny Amalia, New Mexico. (Roberto E. Rosales/The Albuquerque Journal via AP, Pool)

Defendants, from left, Jany Leveille, Lucas Morton, Siraj Wahhaj and Subbannah Wahhaj enter district court in Taos, N.M., for a detention hearing, Monday, Aug. 13, 2018. Several defendants have been charged with child abuse stemming from the alleged neglect of 11 children found living on a squalid compound on the outskirts of tiny Amalia, New Mexico. (Roberto E. Rosales/The Albuquerque Journal via AP, Pool)

 

Last week, police raided a compound near Taos, NM. They found eleven children in various states of physical deprivation and five adults. They also found the body of what is believed to be the son of one of the adults who is believed to have kidnapped the child from his custodial parent, the mother, in Jonesboro, GA. Not only were the children severely neglected, the sheriff reported that there was evidence that the children were being trained to carry out school shootings. The main guy in the compound, Siraj Wahhaj, is the son of a prominent New York Muslim preacher/mullah/imam who is the mentor of leftwing nutter Linda Sarsour and whose mosque was under investigation by NYPD for involvement in terrorism.

(some of this video looks a lot like Katie Couric’s colonoscopy

but that is a differenct story.)

Recap. Five adults. Eleven cases of child neglect/abuse. A dead body. A possible parental kidnapping. Allegations of the kids being trained to be school shooters.

A state District Court judge ruled Monday that prosecutors in the case against five adults found living on a makeshift compound with 11 malnourished children failed to make the case for keeping the defendants in custody while they await trial.

Judge Sarah Backus said the state, despite assertions by prosecutors that one of the defendants was training the children to attack various institutions with guns, didn’t prove the group was a danger to the community.

After hearing nearly four hours of testimony Monday afternoon, Backus set bond for each of the five defendants at $20,000. It’s a “signature bond,” meaning no money is required up front and would be due only if the defendants violate conditions of release.

I am neither a judge nor a lawyer, but from a layman’s perspective, this is nucking futs. This involves a homicide of some type (apparently the dead boy was killed during the course of an exorcism rite); it involves kidnapping across state lines; it possibly involves domestic terrorism and they are freed on what is essentially their own recognizance.