Facebook Refuses to Carry a Republican Candidate's Political Ad for a Totally Predictable Reason

https://t.co/7FPN3TGfj5Alphabet and Facebook stock values are shown on a screen at the Nasdaq MarketSite, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

https://t.co/7FPN3TGfj5Alphabet and Facebook stock values are shown on a screen at the Nasdaq MarketSite, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) 

I was writing this when I noticed my colleague Brandon Morse was writing about Twitter “shadowbanning” undesirables.

Michigan’s state lottery commissioner and former member of Michigan’s House of Representatives, Aric Nesbitt, wants to run for a state senate seat. So he created an ad for Facebook:

“I’m proud to announce my candidacy for State Senate. Lansing needs conservative, West Michigan values, and as our next State Senator, I will work to strengthen our economy, limit government, lower our auto insurance rates, balance the budget, stop sanctuary cities, pay down government debt and be a Pro-Life, Pro-Second Amendment leader for the people. Find out more at www.VoteNesbitt.com.”

This is pretty much Mom-and-Apple-Pie stuff.

But with Facebook, the company that banned the crucifix as too violent, nothing is non-controversial if it isn’t sufficiently woke. This is what happened:

“Facebook apparently doesn’t appreciate our conservative, Midwestern values,” Nesbitt told the Daily Caller. “Modern campaigns require advertising on Facebook to get your message out, apparently Facebook wants to make it tougher for conservatives to get elected.”

The candidate did not appeal, saying, “I was very upset when I read their rejection message, if they don’t want my money I’ll find other ways to get my message out.”

Under Federal law, campaign ads produced by a candidate’s campaign can’t be mucked with by a broadcaster. They don’t have to like them, but they have to carry them as is. The uncharted territory is here is if Facebook will be treated as a broadcaster for FEC purposes.

For the life of me, I don’t understand why so many conservatives look at what is happening with Facebook–banning a crucifix? Seriously?–and Twitter–where the CEO was cheering on a civil war in which conservatives would be crushed and pro-life sites had their ads banned–and keep mouthing over and over that we are being alarmist or, my favorite, they are a private company so they can do what they want. When 100% of the errors on political and cultural “mistakes” run in one direction, it is no longer a mistake, it is a conscious decision. And if you think private companies can do what they want, just try to refuse to bake a cake for a gay wedding.

I can’t help but note that Facebook’s CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, was on Capitol Hill today and not a single question was asked about how Facebook treats politically and culturally conservative material.