Why Did One of Mueller's Top Deputies Meet With the Press and Why Is Department of Justice Investigating It?

Federal prosecutors Sam Buell, far left, and Andrew Weissmann, center, smile as they talk with reporters outside the Federal Courthouse after winning their case against Arthur Andersen in Houston Saturday, June 15, 2002. A jury on Saturday convicted Arthur Andersen of shredding Enron-related documents, dealing the company a huge blow and giving a first victory to prosecutors investigating Enron's collapse. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

Federal prosecutors Sam Buell, far left, and Andrew Weissmann, center, smile as they talk with reporters outside the Federal Courthouse after winning their case against Arthur Andersen in Houston Saturday, June 15, 2002. A jury on Saturday convicted Arthur Andersen of shredding Enron-related documents, dealing the company a huge blow and giving a first victory to prosecutors investigating Enron’s collapse. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

 

Yesterday I posted on Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and FBI Director Christopher Wray folding like cheap suits after they met with Paul Ryan and had a follow-up telephone conversation with House Intelligence Chairman Devin Nunes. At issue was access to documents and witnesses the committee had demanded in a subpoena to Department of Justice and the high probability that Nunes was prepared to carry out his threat to hold both Rosenstein and Wray in contempt unless the complied.

This is the full letter from Nunes to Rosenstein which spells out what they agreed to. The FBI gets to keep a single FD-302, but they must allow Nunes and his investigators to read it. Nunes gets 100% of everything he’d demanded.

Devin Nunes letter to Rod Rosenstein by Chuck Ross on Scribd

But there is another issue that Nunes broaches in his letter that is news to me:

Mueller wasn’t appointed special counsel until May. Weissman wasn’t brought on the team until October. What was Weissman doing in this meeting? Weissman was head of Justice’s Fraud Division (though after the Enron trials/appeals he should have been in jail for fraud) and it would not be unusual for him to meet with the press on major investigations. But if that was the case, neither the FBI nor Nunes would be particularly interested in that. Unfortunately, Weissman is also the guy who sent a fawning email to Sally Yates, kissing her patootie for refusing to do her job and defend Trump’s travel executive order.

And his chain of command included Bruce Ohr, who has since been demoted because of his contacts with Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson.

Whatever, given the new spirit of cooperation shown by Rosenstein and Wray, I’m sure Nunes will get to the bottom of it.