MSNBC's Joan Walsh is Telling Ivanka Trump How to Dress to Succeed. Let That Sink In.

There’s this great scene in the 80s classic female empowerment film “Working Girl” where Melanie Griffith’s character, a would-be corporate executive having to find creative ways to the top, is selecting a dress to wear to a work cocktail party that she believes will show she’s a woman to be reckoned with.

She chooses a great, modest, black cocktail dress that has a little sass because it subtly sparkles. She realizes her mistake when she gets to the event and — lo and behold — the women are dressed in business suits and the female version of neckties (ugh).

But then the great Harrison Ford tells her, “You’re the first woman I’ve seen at one of these things that dresses like a woman, not like a woman thinks a man would dress if he was a woman.”

And that brings us to MSNBC’s Joan Walsh apparently desiring to take us back to the 80s. Back to the time of the horrid ladies’ shoulder pad and gray A-line skirted business suit because she thinks Ivanka Trump should dress the way a man would dress if he was a woman.

Here’s the video clip:

Forgetting for a minute the fact that Walsh is glossing over the more important part of story — the question of the appropriateness of the younger Trump sitting in her father’s place for a minute at the G20 Summit — Walsh just comes across like such a nasty scold, calling the dress “girlie” and suggesting it speaks to how Ivanka values herself.

Joan, with respect, you’re sounding kind of bitter here. And wasn’t it just last week all the liberal, feminist ladies were searching for the smelling salts because a woman wanted to show her bare arms in the speaker’s chamber and was denied due to a longstanding dress code? That Salon subhead calls the denial a “power play.” Was Joan as quick to cite the need to display bare arms as being girlie and anti-feminist? Or is she also engaged in a power play?

I don’t know, and I don’t care. But what I do know, as Melanie Griffith’s Tess tries to prove in “Working Girl,” is that a head for business (or politics) exists regardless of what it’s wrapped in. And, to my knowledge, bows on the sleeves haven’t yet been determined as violating a dress code at a G20 Summit.

So, Joan, relax. Maybe go get a mani-pedi.