Ted Cruz Levels CNN Opinion Writer for Suggesting He and Marco Rubio Are Ashamed of Their Hispanic Heritage

Senator Ted Cruz speaks at the George H.W. Bush Commemorative Center in Midland, Texas for a campaign stop Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. Cruz is on his bus tour campaigning before the mid-term elections. (Mark Rogers/Odessa American via AP)

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX)

Senator Ted Cruz speaks at the George H.W. Bush Commemorative Center in Midland, Texas for a campaign stop Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. Cruz is on his bus tour campaigning before the mid-term elections. (Mark Rogers/Odessa American via AP)

If you’re a conservative who also happens to be part of a so-called “minority” group, you understand all too well how the mainstream media, liberal commentators and other Democrats routinely work to devalue your voice as part of the national conversation.

Simply because you don’t toe the Democratic party line on feminism, illegal immigration, racial quotas, or transgender rights, you are frequently treated as an inauthentic female/Hispanic/black/LGBTQ voter. As someone who is prone to self-loathing.

Even worse than that, oftentimes you’re treated as though your voice doesn’t even exist.

CNN opinion writer Raul Reyes penned a piece that was published earlier today at their website in which he demonstrated this repugnant tactic when describing U.S. Senators Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, who are both of Cuban descent, to former Obama HUD secretary Julian Castro, a Mexican-American.

Reyes lamented Castro’s dropping out of the presidential race, stating Castro “showed that a qualified Latino — specifically, a third-generation Mexican-American — could compete at the highest level of politics.” Also, Reyes stated, Castro “was living proof that a Hispanic deserved positive national attention.”

But what about Cruz and Rubio, who were both presidential candidates in 2016? They were too ashamed of their heritage to count, opined Reyes:

Nonetheless, Castro showed America that a progressive Latino can compete at the highest level of politics and hold his own. For Latinos, he was living proof that a Hispanic deserved positive national attention. And unlike former presidential candidates Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio, Castro was — like the majority of US Latinos — Mexican American, and very proud of his humble origins.

Cruz got wind of what Reyes wrote in his piece, and responded accordingly:

Some of Cruz’s Twitter followers also weighed in with some thoughts:

Cruz also trolled Democrats, CNN, and Reyes with this inconvenient fact:

Ouch.