Bernie May Have Stepped In It With New Comments About Women After Battle With Warren

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., participate in the first of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Tuesday, July 30, 2019, in the Fox Theatre in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Sens. Sanders and Warren

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., participate in the first of two Democratic presidential primary debates hosted by CNN Tuesday, July 30, 2019, in the Fox Theatre in Detroit. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) have been having a dust-up over who said what to whom about women running for president and the battle has caused a rift between their supporters.

Warren claimed that Sanders told her a women couldn’t win the presidency. Sanders has denied that.

After the last debate, they were caught in a tense hot mic moment where Warren accused Sander of calling her a liar and Sanders responded that she had called him a liar.

Many thought Warren was trying to set Sanders up on the hot mic because CNN had already been favoring her in the dispute.

Given Warren’s history of fabrications, most people not CNN or her supporters were probably leaning toward Sanders on the issue. And she stepped in it again over the weekend asking, “How could the American people want someone who lies to them?” without any self-awareness at all.

But Bernie may have clouded the issue for some with his further on the record comments about women during an interview on Sunday.

From Washington Examiner:

Sen. Bernie Sanders riled up tensions between him and fellow left-wing Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren by saying that being a woman, like other characteristics, poses a problem for presidential hopefuls.

“I think everybody has their own sets of problems. I’m 78 years of age, that’s a problem,” Sanders said in an interview Sunday when asked if gender is still an obstacle for female politicians. “If you’re looking at [former South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete] Buttigieg, he’s a young guy. People will say, well, he’s too young to be president. You look at Elizabeth, she is a woman. Everybody brings some negatives, if you’d like.”

“I would just hope very much that the American people look at the totality of a candidate, not at their gender, not at their sexuality, not at their age, but at everything. You know, nobody is perfect,” he added.

That disturbed some that he painted being a woman as a negative.

But he continued to deny he had said what Warren claimed.

“It is hard for me to imagine or anybody in the year 2020 could not believe that a woman could become president in the United States. And if you check my record, I’ve been saying that for 30 years,” Sanders said. He mentioned that he waited to announce his presidential candidacy in 2016 until after Warren indicated that she did not want to run.

His staff later tried to blame Trump for his remarks.

But it wasn’t Trump who make the comments, so that was a pretty lame response.

Trump never attacked Hillary Clinton for being a woman, but always on her record or lack thereof. She did well in numbers which perhaps belies the claim that a woman can’t win. Are there still some people who wouldn’t vote for a candidate for president because she is a woman? Probably. But it wasn’t because Hillary was a woman that she was rejected. It was because she was Hillary Clinton with all the baggage that entails.

Sanders later clarified his remarks saying he was talking about people having to deal with bigotry for being women.

“There is a lot of bigotry. There’s a lot of sexism. There’s a lot of racism. Think about what Barack Obama had to go through. There’s a lot of ageism. There is anti-Semitism. There is homophobia,” Sanders told reporters. “Does anyone doubt that any candidate will not have to deal with those issues?“