The Fight Against Voter Fraud Rages On In Texas

In Texas, the battle to end voter fraud hit another roadblock as the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed previous rulings that the voter ID law passed in 2011 violated the Voting Rights Act.

The law describes the types of photo identification election officials can and cannot accept at the polls; a state driver’s license or ID card, a concealed handgun license, a U.S. passport, a military ID card, or a U.S citizenship certificate with a photo.

Opponents of this law have claimed that the law is inherently racist and discriminates against minorities. They claim that minorities typically do not have any type of the required identification and that it is incredibly difficult for them to obtain it. Texas has made it possible for residents of the state to obtain identification for FREE, as long as they can provide a birth certificate. Essentially, the ID is free as long as you can prove who you are, something anyone of any background should be able to do.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton knows just how important these voter ID laws can be, saying:

“It is imperative that the State government safeguards our elections and ensures the integrity of our democratic process. Preventing voter fraud is essential to accurately reflecting the will of Texas voters during elections,”

For the left, it is quite possible that this battle is driven by a desire to use voter fraud to their advantage. The alternative is that they wish to continue placing minorities in a subclass of their own, claiming that they are unable to produce simple documents or go through the effort to get an ID. It is a concept that is not difficult, but when Democrats constantly tell people “you are too stupid to do this”, they may just start to believe it.

Regardless, this case is far from over. The ID laws are still in place in Texas as the case has been sent back down to a lower court. It is quite possible that this case makes it all the way to the Supreme Court, where the ultimate decision would be made. Only time will tell, but until then one can only hope that Texas and other states will continue to fight back against voter fraud.