Adele Jostles the #Beyhive With Her 'Best Album' Win, Gets Stung

Even before the Grammys aired on Sunday night, Beyonce’s fanbase – known as the #BeyHive – were preparing for idea that she might lose some big awards to Adele.

Well, it happened and the #Beyhive was predictably none-too-pleased. In addition to melancholy, it didn’t take long for cries of “racism” to bubble up to the top.

https://twitter.com/tw3rkology/status/831011546683764736

 

Because we can’t let anything NOT be about race and racism and any-ism and OPPRESSION!!!! OPPRESSION!!! these days of course the #Beyhive is pretty sure Adele won because she’s white. Even Adele seemed to feel that way, taking the opportunity of her acceptance speech to basically apologize for being white and assure the #Beyhive that she has “black friends” and that listening to Bey’s music makes them feel some kind of way.

Ok, Adele. We got it. You’re not a racist.

I’m not a fan of Beyonce’s music but I’m a huge fan of her business prowess and talent. “Lemonade” was a masterpiece from any technical standpoint.

However, while Beyonce enlists dozens of writers and producers per song, Adele writes and produces her own music, plays and instrument and is known for the same kind of honesty in her songs that Beyonce is also hailed for with “Lemonade.”

As an example, here is a list of songwriters on one track on Beyonce’s album:

“Hold Up” , Written by Nick Zinner, Karen O, Brian Chase, Soulja Boy, Kevin McConnell, Antonio Randolph, Mort Schuman, Emile Haynie, Doc Pomus, MeLo-X, MNEK, Ezra Koenig, Beyoncé, Father John Misty, and Diplo.

Here’s a list of songwriters for one of Adele’s biggest hits:

“Hello”,  Written byAdele, Greg Kurstin.

Grammy voters aren’t fans. They’re industry professionals who intimately understand the craft of making and selling music. Beyonce received her fair share of accolades last night. Adele’s were well earned also. It was her choice to break her award in half to share with Beyonce, but the voters determined her work was more worthy of recognition.

It’s not racism. It’s called being a professional.