WATCH: Condoleezza Rice Slights Trump Over North Korea 'Rhetoric'

Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said Tuesday night that President Donald Trump should watch his rhetoric when it comes to dealing with the nuclear weapons threat from North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, once again highlighting the conflicting factions of the Republican Party, especially when it comes to the president’s approach to foreign policy.

While Trump’s supporters say the president is simply acting “tough” by name-calling Kim Jong Un “Rocket Man,” and is showing America’s strength by ominously referring to the “calm before the storm” while surrounded by military leaders at the White House, the more moderate and level-headed wing of the party says the commander-in-chief’s rhetoric is not exactly helpful.

“Unpredictable is OK,” Rice told Fox News host Dana Perino. Rice and Perino both served in former President George W. Bush’s administration as secretary of state and press secretary, respectively. However, Rice warned the current president, “you want … to watch your rhetoric.”

“I can remember in crisis after crisis, your rhetoric gets hotter and hotter and hotter, escalates more and more and more. Really, it just puts an environment around the problem that’s hard to get it solved, so I fully understand what the president’s saying,”Rice told Perino.

“The North Koreans with the nuclear weapons — unacceptable,” Rice continued. “The North Korean leader is a rather odd character. And the United States will not accept it.”But having said that, I think it’s time to step back and let the diplomacy work,” the former secretary of state said.

It’s nice to know that level heads still exist within the Republican Party. If anything has come of these past few days, during which Republican Sen. Bob Corker called the White House, controlled by his own political party, an “adult day care center,” it’s that there at least some lawmakers who former U.S officials who put their country before their party and speak out against what they see as a potential danger to American interests abroad.

If only there were more people in Washington, D.C., who were willing to do the same.