Sean Hannity Becomes a Hysterical Ninny Over Kevin Williamson's Piece About 'Hysterical Ninnyism'

Sean Hannity lost what was left of his grasp of reality when he decided to quit being a conservative pundit and start being a full-time Trump apologist. He’s constantly spoiling for a fight with anyone who dares to question his glorious leader. The Hannity/Trump relationship is one that always calls to mind Chester and Spike, the dogs from Looney Tunes. (I’ll leave it to you to figure out which man is which dog.)

Yesterday it was—of all people—Bette Freaking Midler. Today Hannity is stomping his feet and shaking his fists at National Review’s Kevin Williamson. Williamson wrote a rather brilliant piece today about the hysteria gripping much of America which in addition to not being sufficiently obsequious to Trump suggested that Hannity might be a “ninny.”

In the words of the sage: “Settle down, Beavis.”

We are in the midst of a great and greatly embarrassing national outbreak of hysterical ninnyism, for the moment focused on the person of Donald J. Trump, the failed casino operator and reality-television figure who was inexplicably elected president of these United States by an electorate that apparently has abandoned (together with its senses) the national motto of “E Pluribus Unum” for “Hey, how could it possibly be any worse?” which is of course the most unconservative sentiment there is.

Some of this is to be expected. We expect hysterical ninnyism from talk radio and the cable-news ranters and the more jackass corners of the Internet. It is always the end of the world when you have gold coins to peddle and dehydrated apocalypse lasagnas to move: Ron Paul loves freedom, and he loves, loves, loves his freeze-dried ice cream. Nuts are nuts, and it is the nature of certain subgenres of media to bring out the shallowness and stupidity in people who didn’t know they had it in them: Watching the underlying business realities of MSNBC transform Chris Hayes into the Sean Hannity of the Left has been painful to watch, but it was not entirely unexpected.

Read the rest of Williamson’s post. It is pretty spot on in capturing the overall craziness that is resulting from the hyper partisan, binary mentality of many on both the right and the left. Everything is literally the worst thing ever for these people. They’re running out of negative superlatives and frankly losing their minds.

All of the analysis clearly went over Hannity’s head at the cruising altitude of a private jet. What set him off was being called a ninny—well, that and discovering that Williamson had long ago blocked him on Twitter.

In a manner reminiscent of Donald Trump, Sean tweeted his rage at Williamson.

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/863057689764560897

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/863058481447874560

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/863059465964269568

https://twitter.com/seanhannity/status/863059287551225857

Hannity likes to point out how people were “wrong in 2016.” It’s way to early to say that anyone was wrong in predicting that Trump would be a lousy choice for President. A decent SCOTUS pick is great but the jury is still out on whether picking an unprincipled lifelong Democrat to lead the Republican Party and redefine the conservative movement was being “right in 2016.” That determination is one for the historians.

The word “elitist” on the right is getting like “racist” on the left. It’s just an vapid epithet, so naturally Hannity uses it liberally.

https://twitter.com/KevinNR/status/863102645288022017

https://twitter.com/CTBellows/status/863063574381563904

https://twitter.com/KevinNR/status/863064097654493184

https://twitter.com/KevinNR/status/863103169626341378

https://twitter.com/KevinNR/status/863122625287139330

What Hannity or Trump said or did in the past no longer matters. The only people who should be held accountable for past words and deeds are those who aren’t loyal to President Trump. Consistency and principle are out, tribalism and personality cults are in.

It’s no wonder that Sean Hannity is triggered by criticism of “hysterical ninnyism” though.

He has every reason to take that personally.