BREAKING: Second Underage Victim of The Lincoln Project's John Weaver Comes Forward

AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File

The independent reporter who broke the story of John Weaver’s sexual harassment and grooming of young boys, Ryan Girdusky, appeared on Laura Ingraham Monday night to report even more disturbing information about The Lincoln Project’s John Weaver. As the New York Times reported, more than two dozen young men reported that John Weaver had sent them sexual texts and messages, engaged in “grooming” behavior, and intimated that he would help them with their political careers if they had sex with him. The youngest victim was 14 when Weaver sent him sexual messages. Weaver’s co-founders and The Lincoln Project itself mostly ignored the scandal until the Times’ report published, but once it was known that Weaver had creeped on a 14-year-old they were suddenly repulsed by his behavior.

According to Girdusky’s report, that incident wasn’t a one-off. Another young man, who’s still a minor at this time, contacted Girdusky and shared that John Weaver had sexually harassed him. The young man does not want his name used, Girdusky said, but Girdusky has reviewed the communications between Weaver and the young man himself.

The latest allegation is heartbreaking and infuriating. According to multiple reports, the co-founders were aware that there were allegations of sexual misconduct against Weaver no later than the summer of 2020. While they might not have known that Weaver was contacting underage young men, the men Weaver contacted were all very young – barely legal. It’s not a stretch to think that he might have approached even younger boys. Since two have come forward, it wouldn’t be surprising to learn that there are more.

The Lincoln Project broke its Twitter silence today, posting a statement that they have “retained the law firm of Paul Hastings to investigate allegations of inappropriate behavior by John Weaver as part of a comprehensive review of our operations and culture.”

According to Girdusky, attorneys at that firm are donors to The Lincoln Project, raising a question of whether they can be truly impartial or if there might be an incentive to ignore any evidence that Weaver’s colleagues knew about his behavior.