Here Is Proof That the Social Justice Community Doesn't Actually Care About Minority Culture

(AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

The term “Latinx” is a social justice term that isn’t even liked among Latin people yet is continuously used by companies, likely pushed on by the woke members of their agency of records or within the companies themselves.

Recently, America’s most popular online video game store, Steam, began a promotion for Latin-centric or Latin-made video games. They described it as the “Latinx Games Festival.”

Before that, Peloton did something similar by promoting a “Latinx heritage month.”

“We’re proud to celebrate Latinx heritage, and the strong voices within the vibrant community. This exciting month honors the influence and strength of Latin American and Hispanic cultures,” reads the email Peloton sent out for the promotion. “The celebration starts September 15 with live and on-demand classes featuring music by Latinx artists from around the world.”

The issue here is that there is no “Latinx” community. There is the Latin community and according to the Latin community, they overwhelmingly do not like the term. According to Pew Research, Latin peoples reject the term by 98 percent, with only two percent saying they preferred the term.

(READ: SJWs Get it Wrong Again as Hispanic Community Reveals Woke “Latinx” Label Is Frowned Upon)

This information isn’t exactly hidden away. It’s been reported on by major news outlets as well.

So why does the social justice community continue to push the term? That’s easy.

The social justice adherents like to brand themselves as the protesters and even leaders of minority communities but the truth is that they don’t really care about them. What they care about is pushing their non-compromising ideology on the populace.

This behavior is consistent with the social justice community’s insistence that they are the ones who define the culture, not anyone else. Any rejection is either ignored, as it is being ignored with the Latin community, or it results in Alinskyite isolation and destruction, or “cancel culture” as it’s now known.

If the social justice community was here to help and help minorities with their voice they would have dropped the “Latinx” phrasing once the community spoke out, but it’s not really their goal. Their goal is ideological domination and pushing their terminology is one big component of this.

The easiest way to do this is to push it through corporations who not only contribute money through the ads they introduce into the mainstream culture but tie it to the product many people use every day. The terminology is normalized and the social justice community is then allowed to control conversations on their terms. Other words may be labeled as “faux pas” or outdated in order to weed out anything that might be more individualistic or complicate the narrative.

This political correctness has been invading our society for years but it seems to have gone into overdrive lately and it’s being done at the expense of the minority communities the social justice advocates and activists claim to speak for.

Minorities are being used, not supported.