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The Real Reason They Hated Trump's Balcony Moment

Official White House Photo by Tia Dufour

 

After a few days at Walter Reed Medical Center, President Donald Trump made a triumphant return to the White House after having suffered minimally from the Chinese coronavirus. He famously stood on the balcony, removed his mask, and sent CNN into a meltdown.

They accused him of sending the wrong message, and that telling people not to be afraid of COVID and not letting it dominate your life was dangerous to the American people.

You can watch it for yourself below, in this tweet by CNN White House correspondent Kaitlin Collins.

Whether this is the “wrong message” to send to the American people is up for debate, but anyone with a lick of common sense would understand that this is an excellent message. Living in fear of something isn’t what Americans do, and our leader arriving back to the seat of America’s highest office and taking off his mask symbolizes that this virus isn’t ruling the country.

We are.

Think pieces and tweets were written about the balcony appearance, including comparing Trump to dictators in the past who have used balconies as displays of power.

He’s hardly alone. Many presidents, including Barack Obama, appeared on the balcony as a show of strong leadership.

This pointless point aside, the big reason the left hates that balcony moment was highlighted by the CNN crew the moment Trump stripped off his mask.

Here’s a 74-year-old man who just went through what is widely thought of as one of the most deadly viruses that has struck Americans – and killed thousands – who just got it, suffered minor setbacks, and won. He even worked while having it, proving that he wasn’t even remotely going to let the virus slow him down.

If the media doesn’t spin it carefully, this moment runs the danger of actually inspiring and encouraging Americans to get out there and not let a virus rule them. The balcony proved that the fearmongering the Democrats and the media have been throwing at the American public for months now is all dust and shadows. The monster scratching under the bed was just a mouse.

A crashing narrative of that veracity could disrupt all sorts of plans, including bringing about questions over whether or not the lockdowns should continue or were even necessary in the first place. The economic killing grip that Democrat leaders have over their jurisdictions would begin looking sinister and more like political tactics to slow Trump down.

Which they are.

The balcony moment spat in the face of the leftist narrative that we are ruled by a virus and that our lives must revolve around it. Trump rejected that idea by allowing the world to watch as he appeared there, stripped off his mask, and stood tall.

This was accompanied by a short video statement that drove the point home.

“I just left Walter Reed Medical Center, and it’s really something very special — the doctors, the nurses, the first responders — and I learned so much about coronavirus” Trump said. “And one thing that’s for certain, don’t let it dominate you. Don’t be afraid of it. You’re gonna beat it. We have the best medical equipment; we have the best medicines — all developed recently — and you’re gonna beat it.”

“We’re the greatest country in the world,” Trump continued. “We’re going back, we’re going back to work, we’re gonna be out front. As your leader, I had to do that. I knew there’s danger to it, but I had to do it. I stood out front; I led. Nobody that’s a leader would not do what I did, and I know there’s a risk, there’s a danger, but that’s okay. And now I’m better and maybe I’m immune, I don’t know.”

“But don’t let it dominate your lives,” Trump concluded. “Get out there, be careful. We have the best medicines in the world, and it all happened very shortly, and they’re all getting approved, and the vaccines are coming momentarily. Thank you very much — and Walter Reed, what a group of people. Thank you very much.”

The balcony was a moment that the left feared and for good reason. They should still fear it. It’s proof that we’re still America, and that we’re in charge of our own destinies — not them.