Venezuela Is So Poor that Even Criminals are Finding Robberies and Theft a Waste of Time

Well, socialism has done it. It finally created a nation where crimes are a thing of the past. This, however, is mainly because crime isn’t paying in a very literal sense.

According to The Sun, criminals and gang members are really cutting back on their use of guns and robbing less. Bullets are now an expensive commodity, and hardly anyone has anything worth taking. This has resulted in a steep drop in homicides:

Gang member El Negrito, 24, told Associated Press: “If you empty your clip, you’re shooting off $15.

“You lose your pistol or the police take it and you’re throwing away $800.”

In something of an unexpected silver lining to the country’s all-consuming economic crunch, experts say armed assaults and killings are plummeting in one of the world’s most violent nations.

The economic crisis prompted a whopping 39 percent drop in homicides over a three-year period, with 10,598 killings in 2018. Officials also report a fall in kidnappings.

The country has been suffering under the oppressive socialism forced upon it by previous leaders, with its inflation skyrocketing to 1 million percent just last year. This has made its currency, the bolivar, worth less than toilet paper. In fact, so worthless is the bolivar, that the digital game currency in the MMORPG World of Warcraft is worth far more.

The inflation rose from a combination of too much investment in its oil, to bloated overspending on social programs brought about by its socialist leaders. Now, a citizen is lucky to find things you and I take for granted on a daily basis.

The problem is so bad in Venezuela, that people needing to be transported to hospitals are taken in repurposed garbage trucks.

Meanwhile, politicians like Bernie Sanders and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez continue to push for a socialist takeover of the American government, all the while dodging questions about socialism’s effects on Venezuela and supporting the current dictator and illegitimate leader of Venezuela, Nicholas Maduro.