Democrats Blow up the Last Bipartisan Refuge in Congress

AP Photo/Steve Helber

Well, it was bound to happen. With the far radical Left now firmly in control of the reins of the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives and Senate, and the Oval Office, they have now managed to blow up the last bipartisan refuge in Congress

As our sister site PJ Media reported the breaking news on late Thursday afternoon, that vote concerned the majority in the House excising both the Hyde and Weldon Amendments from a Medicaid-included spending bill:

For the first time in 45 years, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a spending bill funding Medicaid without the Hyde Amendment, a measure that protects taxpayers from being forced to pay for abortion. The spending bill will face a tough hurdle in the Senate, but the bill still sets a terrifying precedent for pro-life taxpayers.

The bill, which includes seven of the twelve annual appropriations bills to fund the government for the next fiscal year, which begins on October 1, passed the House 219-208 along party lines.

Republicans opposed the bill because Democrats had removed two essential abortion-related provisions: the Hyde Amendment and the Weldon Amendment, which prohibits agencies receiving federal funding from discriminating against entities because they refuse to provide or pay for abortions.

Ironically, one Democrat lawmaker who called out the Hyde Amendment as racist proclaimed what may well be the most racist and disingenuous remark ever made about abortions and low-income Americans. As Tyler O’Neill wrote:

“These provisions have long had a terrible and disproportionate impact on low-income women and women of color,” Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.), a senior member of the House Appropriations Committee, argued. “Getting them off the books will be a huge step forward for reproductive and racial justice.”

The day was not without some positive news in the fight against the death merchants on the Left. Earlier this evening, my colleague Jennifer Oliver O’Connell shared that 12 Republican governors had filed a brief on a pending Mississippi case with the Supreme Court, in which they requested that Roe v. Wade be overturned. And in a sign of solidarity, 228 Republican members of Congress sent an accord, as well.