Florida AG Bondi Sought a "Personal Contribution" From Trump Before Withdrawing From Fraud Case

FILE- In this May 23, 2005, file photo, Donald Trump, left, listens as Michael Sexton introduces him at a news conference in New York where he announced the establishment of Trump University. The manual for Trump University events was precise: the room temperature should be 68 degrees. Seats should be arranged in a theater-style curve. And staff should only provide records to an attorney general if compelled by subpoena. Instructing employees how to stall law enforcement investigations might seem like an unusual part of running a seminar company, but at Trump University it was par for the course. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

As attention surrounding the gilded toad’s remarks about U.S. District Court Judge Gonzalo Curiel’s Mexican heritage light up the airwaves, other details have begun to seep out around the seams.

The maelstrom arose in response to the fraud case against Trump University, one of Trump’s long list of failed business ventures. The for-profit “school” was billed, laughably, as an opportunity to teach regular citizens how to be successful in real estate investment, just as its namesake.

No word yet on if Lesson One consisted of: Have a rich daddy, who leaves you his fortune.

The lawsuit was kicked off in Trump’s home state of New York, by New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman in 2013. Schneiderman has since referred to Trump U as “straight-up fraud.”

Several states have joined the lawsuit, while several others have dropped their pursuit of the case. Notably, then-Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott dropped an investigation into the activities of Trump University, after they agreed to cease operations in the state.

Then there’s Florida and Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.

A new report reveals that AG Bondi personally solicited Trump for campaign contributions at the same time Florida was considering joining the lawsuit against Trump U.

From the Blaze:

“The money came from a Trump family foundation in apparent violation of rules surrounding political activities by charities. A political group backing Bondi’s re-election, called And Justice for All, reported receiving the check Sept. 17, 2013 — four days after Bondi’s office publicly announced she was considering joining a New York state probe of Trump University’s activities.

After the check came in, Bondi’s office nixed suing Trump, citing insufficient grounds to proceed.”

Trump has publicly (and proudly) proclaimed the sway he has over politicians, whom he pays to do his bidding.

“In addition to the money given by his foundation, Trump himself has donated $253,500 since in Florida since 1999, most of it going to Republican candidates, the state party or political committees affiliated with GOP officials. His daughter, Ivanka Trump, also gave a $500 check to Bondi a week before her father’s money came in, as well as another $25,000 to the Republican Party of Florida the following year.

The AP reviewed thousands of pages of records related to consumer complaints about Trump University and its affiliates filed with Bondi’s office. The documents — previously obtained by the Orlando Sentinel, which first reported Trump’s donation to Bondi — reveal a new reservoir of unhappy Trump University customers, despite recent claims from the presumptive GOP presidential nominee that the students of his real estate seminar company were overwhelmingly satisfied.”

More than 60 people in Florida filed complaints, seeking help from the state AG office.

“’I was laid off work for the first time in my life and really need this money to support my family,’ wrote one of the many people seeking help, adding that he had been promised a refund but never received it. ‘$1,400 is so much money for my family.’”

The documents complicate prior claims by Bondi’s office that she received only one consumer complaint about Trump University at the time that she decided not to join the New York investigation.”

This is an ugly turn of events, no matter what side of the argument you stand on. People were hurt and there is little to reassure voters that these practices won’t also follow Trump into the White House, should he make it past the Clinton machine.