Let's Play Name That Party. Corrupt Philadelphia Prosecutor Edition

Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams gestures during a news conference Thursday, March 19, 2015, in Philadelphia. Williams says the fatal December 2014 police shooting of Brandon Tate-Brown during an early morning traffic stop was a tragedy but not a crime. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

If you aren’t familiar with the game Name That Party, it works like this. You find an article about a corrupt state or local official being arrested and you guess how long it will take for the reporter to reveal which party the person belongs to. So far, for Republicans, the longest you have ever had to wait is the first sentence. Democrats are much more interesting.

Take this one, for instance:

Federal officials are to announce corruption charges Tuesday against Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams, law enforcement sources say.

The actual charges are not yet known, but Williams has been under investigation for possible financial irregularities.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office for New Jersey, which has been handling the Williams investigation, has scheduled a news conference in Philadelphia for 3 p.m.

Williams was Philly’s first black district attorney. His tenure has been mired in controversy. He wanted to surf the wave of prosecuting sexual abuse by Catholic priests and managed to railroad four clergymen using evidence that made the Rolling Stone article on sexual assault at UVa look rather Gospel-like. Then he had several of his prosecutors involved in the Porngate scandal and he did nothing.

The Philadelphia Inquirer uses 500 words and 14 paragraphs on the story. The number of times they mentioned his political affiliation? Zero. Not once.