Just in Time: Dictionary.com Alters Definition of 'Court-Packing', the Reason Given Why Is Something Else

AP Photo/Patrick Semansky

I’ve lost count of the number of times in just this year alone that we’ve seen the definitions of words “officially” changed either by dictionary entities or media outlets.

For example, just a couple of months ago, Merriam-Webster conveniently altered the definition of the word “preference” on the same day Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono took issue with then-SCOTUS nominee Amy Coney Barrett’s use of the term “sexual preference” when talking about gay rights cases.

A few months prior to that, MW also agreed to update the definition of the word “racism” after a complaint from a 22-year-old woman who stated in so many words that it was outdated.

In late September as riots were raging in Democrat-run cities like Portland and New York City, the Associated Press updated their stylebook to emphasize how journalists should not use the term “riots” to describe… riots:

The latest entrant in the race to redefine words and terms in order to help Democrats is “court-packing.” In the run-up to Election Day, you’ll remember that Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were asked repeatedly but refused to answer the question of whether or not they would consider pushing for court-packing in the event they won the election.

You may also recall that Biden, Harris, and other Democrats (including many of those masquerading as “reporters” in the media) tried to do an insta-revision of the term to go from meaning what FDR tried to do during his presidency (add seats to the Supreme Court) to meaning simply filling existing court vacancies, which has not EVER been the definition of the term.

The discovery that Dictionary.com had altered their definition of “court-packing” came earlier today, after unhinged Playboy “journalist” Brian Karem thought he was schooling Rep. Jim Jordan (R-OH) on the issue by claiming Republicans already packed the Supreme Court:

Twitter user J.D. Graham then weighed into the conversation by pointing out that sometime in the last month or so, Dictionary.com updated their definition to fall more in line with how Democrats now viewed the term:

Because they were tagged on Graham’s tweet, Dictionary.com responded by giving their rationale for changing it, which – as others correctly noted – was about as Orwellian as it gets:

While they’re at it, Dictionary.com may want to consider updating their logo, too:

Perfect.

It’s really sad that even dictionary outfits have fallen prey to the ever-evolving dogma of Democrats, but here we are.