For Ted Cruz, It Doesn't Matter Where you Start, it Matters Where you Finish

I was openly critical of Ted Cruz here on the front page of RedState for being too friendly with Trump. While Rick Perry, Bobby Jindal, Scott Walker and others were going kamikaze against Trump, Cruz was being coolly noncommittal, appearing in public with Trump and repeatedly calling him “my friend.”

My, how the tables have turned.

One after the other, the other opponents of Trump have boarded the Trump Train – something that is flatly inconsistent with their earlier statements on the matter. See, they didn’t just say they disagreed with Trump on the issues, or that he was inexperienced, or that they would do better. They called him (correctly) unfit for office. They said he was unserious. They called him a con man. They said that putting either the party or the country in his hands would be reckless and dangerous. And they were right.

Meanwhile, slowly, Ted Cruz began to come around. As Trump’s campaign of vitriol grew worse and worse against him, Cruz’s anger slowly began to boil, finally reaching a point of no return when Trump called his wife ugly and suggested that his father was involved in JFK’s assassination.

SO now we are treated to the discordant spectacle of people who loudly and repeatedly called Trump unfit for office appearing in public and encouraging people to vote for him. Meanwhile, Cruz, who was more restrained than most of the other candidates (except Kasich) showed up and spoke in favor of the Republican party and Republican principles, but pointedly would not endorse the man who repeatedly insulted his family on a personal level.

I don’t know, I guess I would have preferred for Ted Cruz to have enthusiastically fought Trump from the beginning as much as some of the other candidates did. But what I know now is that Cruz is the only one who hasn’t made his own words about Trump worthless by telling other people to vote for Trump. And that matters more to me than his campaign strategy earlier on in the contest.