Scalise Will Formally Whip Votes Against Gun Bill; McCarthy Says He's Voting Against It

(AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

After reading the Senate gun control bill then watching not just 10, but 14 spineless Republican US Senators vote to move it forward, freedom-loving people throughout the country were understandably disheartened by Wednesday morning. There’s a bit of good news, however, coming out of a House Republican Caucus meeting and directly from the office of Rep. Steve Scalise (R-LA) about the bill’s prospects in the House.

According to GOP leadership staff, both Scalise and McCarthy told the caucus that they plan to vote against the bill. More importantly, Scalise will formally whip votes against the bill, Fox News Digital exclusively reported, citing Scalise’s spokesperson Lauren Fine.

A decision hasn’t been made as to whether the House GOP leadership will formally encourage its members to vote against the bill, but the fact that this information leaked, attributed to GOP leadership staff, is definitely an indication that McCarthy is leaning that way and a signal to Republicans in the Senate that they shouldn’t be too comfortable in their belief that the bill will sail through the House or that all Republicans should be on board.

Possibly contributing to House leadership’s position is staunch opposition from the Freedom Caucus, which announced its formal opposition to the bill in a statement released Tuesday. That statement listed concerns with funding for “red flag” laws and also said:

“Red flag laws permit the preemptive seizure of firearms from Americans without due process by allowing any person to report a gunowner to law enforcement and petition for the confiscation of that individual’s firearms, even before the gunowner has an opportunity to defend themselves.”

During Wednesday’s meeting, Rep. Scott Perry (R-PA), chair of the House Freedom Caucus, “spoke up…to ask the House GOP to whip against the bill,” according to The Hill.

“It seemed to get some applause,” Perry said. “So, I think that at least for many of the members in the room, they agree.”

Given that every House member has to face the voters in a few short months, including Democrats in swing districts, there is a possibility that some Democrats can be persuaded to either abstain or vote against the bill — especially given the underdog victory of Mayra Flores and the DNC’s inability to defeat Henry Cuellar, both in Texas.

On Tuesday night, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell praised the bill and its “commonsense” provisions, while two members of his leadership team voted against it — so it seems not all is copacetic on the Senate side either.