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Republican Voters Have Bad News for the GOP Establishment

AP Photo/Jason Behnken

Most Republican voters want former President Donald Trump to have influence over the future of the GOP according to a recent Associated Press-NORC poll released on Tuesday. This is the latest in a series of indicators that the conservative base still holds a more favorable view toward Trump than the Republican establishment.

The survey showed that 47 percent of Republican participants indicated that Trump should possess “a lot” of influence over the party’s direction while about 34 percent felt he should have “a little” control over the GOP’s trajectory. Most Republicans seem to have a positive view of the future of the party, but some are still concerned.

The poll showed that 54 percent of Republicans are either “optimistic” or “very optimistic.” About 33 percent stated that they are “pessimistic” about the future of the GOP.

Nevertheless, conservatives do have a reason to be optimistic. All indications seem to point towards significant gains for the GOP during the 2022 midterm elections. The Democrats have insisted on making stupid mistake after stupid mistake and the far-left socialist wing seems to be doing their darnedest to alienate as many moderate voters as humanly possible.

To make matters worse (for the Democrats), President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris cannot seem to climb out of their morass of ineptitude. The issues have become so pronounced that even the activist media has not been able to spin it hard enough.

The Hill reported:

More than six months after an election in which Republicans lost control of both the White House and the Senate, the party is gunning to recapture majorities in both chambers of Congress.

The GOP needs to gain only half a dozen or so seats in the House next year to retake control of the lower chamber and just one in the Senate — a goal that appears well within reach, especially given the tendency of the party of a new president to lose seats in the midterm elections.

But what about Trump and the Republicans?

At this point, it is a given that the establishment will be forced to take Trump’s lead in a significant way. The base has rejected the relics of the pre-Trump era and no establishment figure will survive if they don’t at least signal a willingness to work with the former president.

To underscore this reality, the poll reveals that Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY), who has made her entire platform about bashing Trump, receives more support from Democrats than Republicans. AP reported that she “has the inauspicious distinction of being rated favorably by more Democrats than Republicans, 47% versus 21%.”

As someone who attended the Conservative Political Action Conferences (CPAC) in both Orlando and Dallas, I can tell you that excitement over President Trump is still at a fever pitch among the base. If he were to run again for president, he would easily secure the nomination. However, it seems that there is a growing sentiment on the right that would rather see him remain in his role as a kingmaker while someone else takes the reins in the pursuit of the America First agenda.

Either way, the old guard methods of doing things have now faded into obscurity, likely to never been seen or heard from again. The days of Romney, Cheney, and McCain have quickly become a distant memory. It is clear that the Republican Party is morphing into something much different, but it is still not clear what form this new conservative movement will take.

The outcome of the midterm elections – especially during primary season – might give us a clue as to what will materialize. Will the base elect more Cheneys or will they put more non-establishment types in office? Only time will tell.